Things to Consider Before Filing for Social Security

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Social Security seems straight forward but it can be quite complex, there are many opportunities and pitfalls to watch out for.  Before filing for Social Security, research your options to maximize your benefit, minimize taxes and avoid errors in your benefit calculation.  It’s important to meet with a Social Security Representative prior to filing but don’t solely rely on this information.   Due to the complexity of various options, they may overlook something that could impact your situation

You can file for Social Security benefits as early as 62 but you will receive a reduced benefit.  Most healthy individuals should hold off on taking Social Security as long as possible.  If possible, delay taking Social Security until age 70.  Your benefit will increase 8% a year from your full retirement age to age 70.  The full retirement age for individuals born before 1954 is 66 gradually increasing to age 67 for anyone born in 1960 or later.

Upon reaching full retirement you may be eligible to take 50% of your spouse’s benefit or 100% of your own benefit if you are currently married, were born before 1954 and your spouse has started taking benefits.  While taking spousal benefits, your benefit can continue growing until you reach age 70 at which time you can switch to 100% of your own benefit if it’s higher.  There is no advantage to delaying benefits beyond age 70.

If you have been divorced for two years or more, were married for at least 10 years and are currently unmarried, you are eligible to receive 50% of your ex-spouses benefit or 100% of your own benefit.  If you were born before 1954, at full retirement you have the option to start taking 50% of your ex-spouses benefit and switch to your own retirement benefit at a later date. If you are a widow and you were married for at least 10 years you are eligible to take the highest of 100% of your deceased spouses benefit or your own.

If you take benefits before your full retirement age you are limited on how much you can earn before your benefit is reduced. In 2016, your benefits would be reduced by $1 for every $2 earned over $15,720.  Benefits lost due to work will result in a higher benefit later.  There is no income limit if you wait to take benefits at full retirement. If you take Social Security while working a larger portion of your benefit will be taxable, so you may want to consider delaying Social Security until you stop working or reach age 70.

If you held jobs where you paid into Social Security and you receive a pension from working in a job where you did not pay Social Security, your Social Security benefit may be reduced.  Be sure to notify the Social Security Administration of your pension.

More information on your Social Security benefits is available at www.ssa.gov.