Tips from the Wealthy on How to Get Rich

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

You don’t have to be incredibly intelligent and born into the Rockefeller family to attain wealth.   Below are some pointers commonly shared by wealthy people on how to manage your life and your money to reach financial independence.  There is no magic, achieving financial security involves straight forward, common sense actions to gradually build your net worth.

  1. Write Down Your Goals: It’s great to dream about what you want to achieve but to accomplish something you need to put your goals into writing and create an action plan to attain them.
  2. Control Your Expenses: Take the time to understand and manage your expenses and create a budget that supports your goals.   Spend less than you earn and develop good saving habits.  Keep your expenses in check when things are going well and avoid automatically increasing your expenses as your income grows.
  3. Don’t Buy Status: Don’t buy things to look rich or to impress your friends.  Most wealthy people drive older model used vehicles and live in modest homes.  Use your money to save for the future and spend on what really matters.
  4. Educate Yourself: Getting a good education and selecting the right career is a huge factor in attaining wealth.  A good education can result in a more rewarding job in a field you enjoy.  If you enjoy your work you are more likely to excel and earn more money.  If you are in a dead end job or a career you don’t enjoy consider going back to school to transition into a career for which you have more passion.
  5. Be Patient and Maintain a Long Term Perspective – The key to successful investing is having the patience to ride out fluctuations in the market. Resist the temptation to chase returns and time the market.  Invest for the long term and let your portfolio grow over time.  Stay the course and avoid making decisions triggered by emotions.
  6. Manage Risk and Return – Balance your desire for high return with the risk involved. Maintain a diversified portfolio with adequate short term liquidity to get you through rough spots in the market.   Rebalance on an annual basis to keep your portfolio diversified.  Take a disciplined approach to investing and avoid high risk investments that promise a return that may be too good to be true.
  7. Start your own business – According to Forbes nearly all of the people on their list of billionaires made their money through involvement with a business they or their family had started. Owning your own business may seem too risky but it can provide you with an opportunity for higher earnings and greater control over your financial future.
  8. Avoid Complex Investments – Avoid investing in anything that seems overly complicated or that you don’t fully understand. Complex investments often come with  greater risk, a lack of control, limited marketability, limited transparency and hidden fees.

10 Financial Planning Tips to Start 2012

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

1. Dream – Take a few minutes to look at the big picture and think about what you want from life. How do you want to live, what do you want to do and how do you want to spend your time. Successful businesses have vision statements and strategic plans. Create your own personal vision statement and strategic plan.

2. Set Goals – What are your goals for the coming year? Start by brainstorming – fill a page by listing all the goals that come to mind. Think about different facets of your life such as family, career, education, finance, health and so forth. Review your list and prioritize three or four goals to focus on in the coming year.

3. Evaluate Your Current Situation – What did you spend and what did you earn last year? What was necessary and what was discretionary? Did you spend in a purposeful manner and do your expenses support your goals and strategic plan. How much did you save or invest in a retirement plan? Can you increase this in 2012? If you are like most of us, a category is needed for “I have no clue”.

4. Track Spending and Address Problem Areas – If you aren’t sure where you spent all that discretionary cash, track your expenses for a month or two. It can be very enlightening – Yikes! Identify a few problem areas where you can cut spending and really place some focus. Identify the actions you will take to cut spending in these areas. Set weekly limits and come up with creative alternatives to save you money.

5. Evaluate Your Career – Are you doing what you really want? Are you being paid what you are worth? Have you become too comfortable that you are settling for safe and familiar? Could you earn more or work in a more rewarding position if you took the time to look? Are you current in your field or do you need to take some refresher courses? Do you know what it will take to get a promotion or a better job? In this volatile job market you need to keep your skills current, to nurture your network and to maintain a current resume.

6. Maintain an Emergency Fund – Start or maintain an emergency fund equal to at least four months of expenses, including the current month. This should be completely liquid in a checking, savings or money market account.

7. Pay Off Debt – Establish a plan to pay off all of your credit card debt. Once this is paid off establish a plan to start paying off personal debt and student loans.

8. Save 10-15% of your income (take advantage of employee Benefits) – You need to save at least 10-15% of your income to provide a buffer against tough financial times and to invest for retirement. At a very minimum, you need to contribute up to the amount your employer will match. Additionally, be sure to take advantage of flex benefits or employee stock purchase plans that may be offered by your employer.

9. Maintain a Well Diversified Portfolio – Maintain a well-diversified portfolio that provides you with the best return for your risk tolerance, your investment goals and your investment time horizon. Be sure to re-balance your portfolio on an annual basis. Avoid over reacting to short term swings in the market with money that is invested for the long term.

10. Don’t Pay Too Much Income Tax – Avoid paying too much income tax. Get organized and keep good records to be sure you are maximizing your deductions. Make tax wise investment decisions, harvest tax losses and maximize the use of tax deferred investment vehicles. Donate unwanted items to charity – be sure to document your donations with a receipt.

Take Control of Your Life with a Personal Strategic Plan

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Jane M. Young, CFP,EA

At least once a year we need to step back from our daily routine to look at our lives from a broader perspective. We get so bogged down with daily responsibilities we lose track of where we are, and where we want to go. Take the time to do some personal strategic planning. Start by looking at what you are actually spending and saving. How much do you spend in a typical month, how much is necessary spending and how much is discretionary? How do your expenses compare to your income? How do your expenses and your savings line up with your goals?

Maybe you haven’t thought about your long range goals for awhile. I challenge you to make a list of 30–50 goals that you would like to accomplish over the next five years. I know… that’s a lot! Think of this as a brainstorming exercise. Don’t evaluate the importance of a goal, just write down what comes to mind. If you are having difficulty thinking of 30–50 goals, try thinking of goals in the following categories: friends and family, health, career, social and entertainment, money and finance, spiritual, education, and community. Once you have created your list, prioritize your goals by importance and timeframe. Develop an action plan for your high priority goals.

Now go back and review your expenses. Are your spending and saving habits congruent with your long term goals? Use the information you have pulled together to develop a spending and savings plan that supports your personal strategic plan. Once you have a clear picture of where you are and where you want to go, you can take control of your life.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

Combine Your Financial Goal Setting with a Romantic Valentine’s Day Retreat

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Valentine’s Day is a time for showing love and appreciation for someone special in your life. It’s also a good time to work on your relationship and work on issues that cause conflict. One of the biggest sources of conflict and disagreement in relationships is money. Money itself isn’t the cause of our disagreements; we fight over our divergent goals and priorities for money. Many fights arise out of the lack of communication about our wishes, hopes and dreams. If you and your partner are constantly squabbling about money and how you spend your household income, I have a fun Valentine’s Day solution for you.

I suggest you take a romantic, strategic planning retreat. Block off a full weekend for you and your partner – no children allowed! Select a romantic Inn or Bed and Breakfast somewhere within a reasonable driving distance. The only requirement is a private area with a writing surface. Spend Friday night and all day Saturday discussing your values, sharing dreams, setting goals, creating a budget and making specific plans for the future. Reward yourself with a nice dinner and a romantic evening Saturday night, then play all day Sunday! Make this your Valentine’s Day gift to each other, this year, and every year.

Annual Goal Setting Begins With Thanksgiving

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

As we approach the end of the year we look back on our achievements over the last twelve months and start thinking about goals for next year. I am a strong believer in personal strategic planning and goal setting. The first step in the goal setting process is to evaluate our values. Thanksgiving is the perfect time to reflect on those things for which we are thankful. By acknowledging what we are thankful for, we can easily identify the values that are of greatest importance to us. Once we have clearly identified our values we can set meaningful goals for 2010. When our goals are in integrity with our values we are more likely to monitor and achieve them. We will find that reaching our goals will be much more relevant and rewarding.

Take a few minutes to write down what you are thankful for this holiday season. Don’t forget to show gratitude to those around you who have helped you to achieve your goals or just put a smile on your face over the past year.

Happy Thanksgiving!!