Things to Consider Before Filing for Social Security

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Social Security seems straight forward but it can be quite complex, there are many opportunities and pitfalls to watch out for.  Before filing for Social Security, research your options to maximize your benefit, minimize taxes and avoid errors in your benefit calculation.  It’s important to meet with a Social Security Representative prior to filing but don’t solely rely on this information.   Due to the complexity of various options, they may overlook something that could impact your situation

You can file for Social Security benefits as early as 62 but you will receive a reduced benefit.  Most healthy individuals should hold off on taking Social Security as long as possible.  If possible, delay taking Social Security until age 70.  Your benefit will increase 8% a year from your full retirement age to age 70.  The full retirement age for individuals born before 1954 is 66 gradually increasing to age 67 for anyone born in 1960 or later.

Upon reaching full retirement you may be eligible to take 50% of your spouse’s benefit or 100% of your own benefit if you are currently married, were born before 1954 and your spouse has started taking benefits.  While taking spousal benefits, your benefit can continue growing until you reach age 70 at which time you can switch to 100% of your own benefit if it’s higher.  There is no advantage to delaying benefits beyond age 70.

If you have been divorced for two years or more, were married for at least 10 years and are currently unmarried, you are eligible to receive 50% of your ex-spouses benefit or 100% of your own benefit.  If you were born before 1954, at full retirement you have the option to start taking 50% of your ex-spouses benefit and switch to your own retirement benefit at a later date. If you are a widow and you were married for at least 10 years you are eligible to take the highest of 100% of your deceased spouses benefit or your own.

If you take benefits before your full retirement age you are limited on how much you can earn before your benefit is reduced. In 2016, your benefits would be reduced by $1 for every $2 earned over $15,720.  Benefits lost due to work will result in a higher benefit later.  There is no income limit if you wait to take benefits at full retirement. If you take Social Security while working a larger portion of your benefit will be taxable, so you may want to consider delaying Social Security until you stop working or reach age 70.

If you held jobs where you paid into Social Security and you receive a pension from working in a job where you did not pay Social Security, your Social Security benefit may be reduced.  Be sure to notify the Social Security Administration of your pension.

More information on your Social Security benefits is available at www.ssa.gov.

Avoid These Common Retirement Mistakes

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

When it comes to retirement there are many preconceived notions and myths on how you should handle your finances.  Avoid falling into the trap of what retirees are “supposed to do”.  Instead, logically evaluate your situation and make decisions accordingly.   Below are some common financial mistakes to avoid with regard to your retirement.

  • Don’t underestimate your life expectancy and how many years you will spend in retirement. It is reasonable to spend 20 to 30 years in retirement.  Most retiree’s should plan to cover expenses well into their 90’s.
  • Avoid overestimating your ability and opportunity to work during retirement. Be cautious about including too much income for work during retirement in your cash flow projections.  You may lose your job or have trouble finding a good paying position.  Additionally, your ability and desire to work during retirement may be hindered by health issues or the need to care for a spouse.
  • Many retirees invest too conservatively and fail to consider the impact of inflation on their nest egg. Maintain a diversified portfolio that supports the time frame in which you will need money.  Money needed in the short term should be in safer, fixed income investments.  Alternatively, long term money can be invested in stock mutual funds where you have a better chance to earning returns that will outpace inflation.
  • Resist the temptation to take Social Security early. Most people should wait and take Social Security at their full retirement age or later, full retirement is between 66 and 67 for most individuals.  Taking Social Security early results in a reduced benefit. If you can delay taking Social Security you can earn a higher benefit that increases 8% per year up to age 70.  This can provide nice longevity insurance if you live beyond the normal life expectancy.  You also want to avoid taking Social Security early if you are still working.  In 2016 you will lose $1 for every $2 earned over $15,720, prior to reaching your full Social Security retirement age.
  • Avoid spending too much on your adult children. The desire to help your children is natural but many retirees need this money to cover their own expenses.   You may be on a fixed income and no longer able to earn a living, your children should have the ability to continue working for many years.

One of the biggest retirement mistakes is the failure to do any retirement planning.  Crunch some numbers to determine how much you need to put away, when you can retire, and what kind of budget you will need to follow.  Without proper planning many retirees pull too much from their investments early on leaving them strapped later in life.  It’s advisable to have your own customized retirement plan done to determine how much you can annually pull from your investments.  As a general rule, annual distributions should not exceed 3-4% of your retirement portfolio.

Taking Social Security Early Not the Best Option

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

The best time to take Social Security is a personal decision based on your financial situation, health, lifestyle, family longevity and when you stop working.  Social Security will provide you with the same total amount, if you live to the average life expectancy, regardless of when you take it.   The full retirement age for most people is between 66 and 67.  You can begin taking reduced benefits as early as 62 or you can wait and take an increased benefit as late as age 70.  If you begin at 62 your benefit is reduced by about 30%, if you take Social Security after your full retirement date your benefit will increase 8% per year until age 70.

You will probably benefit from taking Social Security at full retirement or later.  Unless you have a serious medical condition, there is a good chance you will live longer than the Social Security average life expectancy.  Social Security life expectancy tables are based on 2010 data and lag what can be reasonably expected.  They indicate a 65 year old male will live to around 84.3 and a 65 year old female will live to around 86.6.  Taking Social Security later is like buying longevity insurance.  It can provide you with more money later in life which can help put your mind at ease, if you are worried about out living your money.

If you are still working it can be especially detrimental to take Social Security before your full retirement age.  In 2015 you will lose $1 for every $2 earned over $15,720.   Once you reach full retirement age there is no limit to how much you can earn.   However, taxation of your Social Security benefit is based on your overall earnings.  If you take Social Security after you stop working a smaller portion of your benefit is likely to be taxable.  Additionally, if you continue to work and delay Social Security you may be able to increase your total Social Security benefit. The Social Security Administration annually recalculates benefits for recipients who are still working.

The decision on when to take Social Security is significantly impacted by your marital status and your spouses expected benefit.  If you have been married for at least ten years you have the option to take the greater of 50% of your spouse’s benefit or your full benefit. If you wait until your full retirement age you can start taking 50% of your spouse’s benefit, let your benefit grow, and switch back to your full benefit at age 70.   If you take the spousal benefit prior to your full retirement age you cannot switch back to your own benefit at a later date.  If you have been married for at least 10 years, and your spouse dies, you are eligible for the greater of your benefit or 100% of your spouse’s benefit.

More information about your Social Security benefit is available at www.ssa.gov.

Gradual Retirement Can Ease Stress and Cash Flow

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

As the average life expectancy increases retirement is starting to look very different.   We may be less likely to completely stop working on a fixed, predetermined date.  As the traditional retirement age of 65 approaches many are considering a more gradual transition into retirement.

One advantage of easing into retirement includes the ability to supplement your cash flow and reduce the amount needed to be withdrawn from your retirement savings.  If you continue working after 65 you may be able to earn enough to delay taking Social Security until 70.  This will provide additional financial security because your Social Security benefit increases 8% per year from your normal retirement age to age 70.  The normal Social Security retirement age is between 66 and 67.

Abruptly going into retirement can be very traumatic because careers provide us with a sense of purpose, a feeling of accomplishment and self-esteem.   Your social structure can also be closely tied to work.  By working part time before completely retiring, you can gradually transition into the new phase of your life.   As you approach retirement age the grind of working 40 to 50 hours per week can become very trying.   Working part time allows you to stay engaged with your career while taking some time to relax and pursue other interests.

According to a 2012 study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more people are working beyond age 65.  In 2012 about 18.5% of Americans over 65 were still working vs. only 10.8% in 1985.  A study reported by the Journal of Occupational Health and Psychology stated there are health benefits from working part time during retirement.  This may be attributed to less stress and a more balanced life while experiencing the mental stimulation gained from continued engagement at work.

Gradually transitioning into retirement may be more practical for someone who is self-employed.  However, the concept of phased retirement is a hot topic among human relations firms and departments.  Phased retirement programs usually involve working about 20 hours a week with some element of mentoring less experienced workers.  Formal phased retirement programs are still rare but they are gaining popularity.  A 2010 study by AARP and the Society for Human Resources Management found that about 20% of the organizations polled had a phased retirement program or were planning to start a one.  In fact, the federal government just launched a phased retirement program.

Before signing up for a phased retirement plan, take steps to fully understand the impact it may have on your benefits.  If you are under 65 there may be restrictions on your health insurance.   Additionally, some pension calculations are based on your final years of salary, working fewer hours at this time could negatively impact your benefit.  Also avoid situations where you are only paid for 20 hours a week but still work 30 or 40 hours to get your job done.

Understanding Social Security Survivors Benefits is Worth the Effort

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

There are a myriad of different Social Security options available to widows and widowers.  If you have lost a spouse, it is worthwhile to take the time required to fully understand your Social Security benefits. As a widow or widower, you have the choice of taking Social Security based on your own work record, or Social Security based on the work record of your spouse (survivor benefits).  You are eligible for 100% of your deceased spouse’s basic benefit, at full retirement age.  Reduced benefits are available as early as age 60, and if you are disabled, benefits can begin at 50.  The full retirement age is 66 if you were born between 1945 and 1956, and gradually increases up to 67 if you were born between 1957 and 1960.  The normal retirement age for everyone born after 1960 is 67.

If you started taking Social Security on your own record, before the loss of your spouse, call Social Security to see if you can receive more in the form of survivor benefits.  One nice feature of Social Security survivor’s benefits is the option to begin taking benefits based on your own earnings record, and later switch to survivors benefits.  Conversely, you can begin taking survivor’s benefits and later switch to benefits based on your own work record.   Unlike standard spousal benefits, you can switch even if you started taking benefits prior to reaching full retirement age.

Generally, you cannot get survivor’s benefits if you remarry before age 60.  After age 60, remarriage does not impact your benefits.  Additionally, at age 62 you are eligible to get benefits based on your new spouses benefits.  You may have the choice between benefits based on your own work record, benefits based on the work record of your deceased spouse, or benefits based on the work record of your current spouse.  Unfortunately, you have to choose from one of these options.  If other family members are entitled to survivor’s benefits, there is a limit to the total amount that can be paid to a family.

 If you receive a pension from a federal, state, or local government job where you did not pay Social Security, your survivor’s benefits may be reduced.    Your Social Security benefits will be reduced by two thirds of your government pension.  Additionally, if you collect Social Security based on your own work record, and you receive a pension from a job where you did not pay Social Security, your benefit may be reduced due to the Windfall Elimination Provision. Be sure to discuss this with your Social Security representative before you file for benefits.

Social Security survivor’s benefit can be very complex; please take the time to fully understand your options.  Before filing for Social Security, research the options available to you at www.socialsecurity.gov and meet with a Social Security representative to fully understand your choices.

The Widow’s Guide to Social Security Benefits

The Widow’s Guide to Social Security Benefits (via Credit.com)

As a Certified Financial Planner™, I work with a lot of widows trying to navigate the tricky world of Social Security benefits after their spouse passes away. Social Security provides you, as a widow, with a choice between your own Social Security benefit based on your work history, and a survivor…

Pitfalls in Taking Early Social Security

Jane M. Young CFP, EA

 

You can begin taking Social Security at age 62 but there are some disadvantages to starting before your normal retirement age.   The decision on when to start taking Social Security is dependent on your unique set of circumstances.  Generally, if you plan to keep working, if you can cover your current expenses and if you are reasonably healthy you will be better off taking Social Security on or after your normal retirement age.  Your normal retirement age can be found on your annual statement or by going to www.socialsecurity.gov and searching for normal retirement age.

Taking Social Security early will result in a reduced benefit.  Your benefits will be reduced based on the number of months you receive Social Security before your normal retirement age.    For example if your normal retirement age is 66, the approximate reduction in benefits at age 62 is 25%, at 63 is 20%, at 64 is 13.3% and at 65 is 6.7%.  If you were born after 1960 and you start taking benefits at age 62 your maximum reduction in benefits will be around 30%.

On the other hand, if you decide to take Social Security after your normal retirement age, you may receive a larger benefit.  Do not wait to take your Social Security beyond age 70 because there is no additional increase in the benefit after 70.  Taking Social Security after your normal retirement age is generally most beneficial for those who expect to live beyond their average life expectancy.  If you plan to keep working, taking Social Security early may be especially tricky.  If you take benefits before your normal retirement age and earn over a certain level, the Social Security Administration withholds part of your benefit.   In 2012 Social Security will withhold $1 in benefits for every $2 of earnings above $14,640 and $1 in benefits for every $3 of earnings above $38,880.  However, all is not lost, after you reach full retirement age your benefit is recalculated to give you credit for the benefits that were withheld as a result of earning above the exempt amount. 

Another potential downfall to taking Social Security early, especially if you are working or have other forms of income, is paying federal income tax on your benefit.  If you wait to take Social Security at your normal retirement age, your income may be lower and a smaller portion of your benefit may be taxable.  If you file a joint return and you have combined income (adjusted gross income, plus ½ of Social Security and tax exempt interest) of between $32,000 and $44,000 you may have to pay income tax on up to 50% of your benefit.  If your combined income is over $44,000 you may have to pay taxes on up to 85% of your benefit. 

The decision on when to take Social Security can be very complicated and these are just a few of the many factors that should be taken into consideration.

 

 

 

Luncheon Workshop on Social Security – September 19th

Please join us for our next Fireside Chat Luncheon!  I will touch on several areas that may impact your Social Security benefits including pointers on when to start taking Social Security, taxation of your benefits and spousal and survival benefits.

We will have a light lunch available starting at 11:30 and the presentation will begin at 11:45.

When & Where:

7025 Tall Oak Drive, Suite 210

Colorado Springs, CO 80919

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

This workshop is free of charge by you must register.  Please call Shelby at (719)260-9800 to reserve a slot for this session; seating is limited.

 

O’Connor: Investors urged not to panic as U.S. default looms

Last Updated: July 27. 2011 1:00AM

Brian J. O’Connor

O’Connor: Investors urged not to panic as U.S. default looms

Many doubt leaders, in the end, will fail to act, trigger default

With the deadline to raise the federal debt ceiling drawing closer by the day — and the risk that the U.S. could default on its sovereign debt growing — individual financial planners are fielding lots of calls from worried investors.

A failure to raise the debt ceiling that prompts a U.S. default would cause stock and bond prices to plummet, interest rates to rise, credit for mortgages, cars and other debt to pucker up, and knock the wobbly economic recovery flat on its face. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke himself has warned that letting the federal government run out of money would be “catastrophic.”

Nonetheless, advisers say individual investors should stick to their investment strategies for three good reasons:

First, most planners doubt that even the kinds of people who get elected to Congress these days will really allow the U.S. to default on its debt.

Second, in the case of a cataclysmic financial disaster, the traditional safe havens, such as U.S. Treasuries and even greenbacks, would take a hit.

And third, most individual investors just bungle it when they try to time when to enter and exit the stock market. “You’ve got to know when to sell but when to buy back in, too,” says Lyle Wolberg, a certified financial planner with Telemus Capital Partners in Southfield. “So you’ve got to be right twice. And that’s hard to do.”

Financial experts all agree that a U.S. debt default would be a serious, serious issue. But would it be as big as the worst global crash since the Great Depression? After all, the Dow Jones index has recovered nearly 90 percent of its record high from late 2007, at the peak of the real estate bubble. So unless you’re sure a possible U.S. default would create another great recession, it may not be worth the cost and worry to start rearranging your investments.

And even if it is, a well-structured investment portfolio already is positioned to ride out those kinds of losses.

“The diversification we’ve had in place is to address all these issues, so there really are no moves to make,” says Bill Mack, a certified financial planner who runs William Mack & Associates in Troy. “If you’re in inappropriate investments now, especially if you’re too heavy into equities, I’d be concerned. But this is a short-term event and your portfolio should be geared toward long-term objectives.”

With bonds, stocks and even U.S. Treasuries taking a hit in a default, investors really don’t have many places to run. Some analysts have suggested Swiss francs, an investment that’s well beyond the means and expertise of most folks trying to protect a 401(k) or Individual Retirement Account. Other strategies — from the popular but very risky choice of gold, to moving from long-term to short-term bonds or switching to high-dividend-yielding blue-chip stocks — are common suggestions.

But those strategies have been in place for more than year now, as investors anticipated rising interest rates, more inflation or looked for safe income to replace low-yield Treasuries.

“There isn’t a whole lot you can do that hasn’t been covered by the markets,” says Karen Norman, a certified financial planner with Norman Financial Planning in Troy. “Positioning yourself other than running for cash is tremendously difficult.”

Even cash would lose some value as the dollar would decline after a default, making it more expensive to buy imported goods, including gasoline. The advantage would be that a switch to cash now would leave an investor positioned to go bargain-hunting when stocks slide after a default. But individual investors who make regular contributions to a 401(k) or IRA already buy more shares with every deduction from their paychecks or automated payment from the checking accounts, so they’re already positioned to buy low once stocks hit the skids, just as they’ve done throughout the entire downturn.

The reason to go to cash now, says Nina Preston, a certified financial planner with the Society for Lifetime Planning in Troy, is if you need a stable stash to cover your short-term income requirements, such as retirees who are counseled to hold three to five years worth of needed income in cash or equivalents. But if you need to do that, you’re already holding too much stock.

“If you need to flee to cash,” Preston says, “you should have been in cash to start with.”

The final drawback to moving your money around — even to cash — is that you’ll probably do the wrong thing, warns Mack.

“If people are adamant about going to cash, if they feel it in their bones that the world is coming to an end, at what point do they say, ‘It’s time to get back in?'” he asks. “Don’t tell me its when you feel better because that’s too late. It just doesn’t work to follow your gut feelings.”

The bottom line is that investors need a strategy that lets them ride out short-term economic woes, even if they’re self-inflicted by our own leaders.

“We’ve looked ahead and positioned ourselves the best way we can,” Norman says. “Now we need these folks in Washington to do their duty. That’s what we’re paying them to do.”

Which means that your best investment option is a very easy one — picking up the phone and placing a call to your congressman or congresswoman.

boconnor@detnews.com

 http://detnews.com/article/20110727/OPINION03/107270346/O-Connor–Investors-urged-not-to-panic-as-U.S.-default-looms#.TjMnDLApgnQ.email

Watch Out for These Pitfalls with Social Security and IRA Rollovers

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Here are a couple issues on Social Security and IRA Rollovers that frequently catch people by surprise.

Think twice about taking your Social Security at 62 or before your regular retirement age, if you plan to work during this timeframe. In 2011, if you earn more than $14,160, Social Security will withhold $1 for every $2 earned above this amount. However, all is not lost, when you reach full retirement age Social Security will increase your benefits to make up for the benefits withheld. Once you reach your full retirement age there is no reduction in benefits for earning more than $14,160. However, the amount of tax you pay on your Social Security benefits will increase as your taxable income increases. This may be a good reason to wait until your full retirement age or until you stop working to begin taking Social Security.

If you are thinking about moving your IRA from one custodian to another I strongly encourage you to do this as a direct transfer and not as a rollover. We frequently use these terms synonymously but I assure you the IRS does not! A transfer is when you move your IRA directly from one IRA trustee/custodian to another – nothing is paid to you. A rollover is when a check is issued to you and you write a second check to the new IRA Trustee/Custodian. This must be done within 60 days or the transaction is treated as a taxable distribution. You can do as many transfers as you desire in a given year. However, you can only do one rollover per year, on a given IRA. This is a very stringent rule and there are very few exceptions even when the error is out of your control. Whenever possible be sure to use a direct transfer not a rollover to move your IRA Account.

Solve the Deficit Problem by Cutting Government Spending – You Don’t Stop the Spending by Refusing to Increase the Debt Ceiling

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

A few clients and friends have asked me if they should be making changes to their investment allocations based on the uncertainty around raising the debt ceiling. While we don’t want to bury our heads in the sand we should not over react to something that probably won’t come to pass. In my opinion the political stakes are way too high for all parties concerned to allow the U.S. to default on its obligations. At the moment everyone is playing chicken but at the end of the day, neither party can afford the political fallout that would result in a failure to raise the debt ceiling. This does present a great opportunity for the media to get attention with sensationalistic, doomsday headlines to help them sell newspapers or television spots. This is also a great opportunity for political posturing on the part of both Democrats and Republicans. It is my projection that on August 2nd we will still have a huge deficit problem and a higher debt ceiling.

The debt ceiling is an indication of a much bigger problem with federal government spending. The problem is not solved by changing the debt ceiling; the problem was created when congress approved spending resulting in the need to raise the debt ceiling. Failure to raise the debt ceiling is like trying to close the barn door after the horse has gotten out. Refusing to raise the debt ceiling is a meaningless gesture, with regard to our deficit. However, it carries a catastrophic impact on the perceived safety of U.S. debt which would ripple down through all aspects of our financial lives. This is clearly not an acceptable course of action. The real issue is getting a handle on government spending and the deficit which will require major reforms to Social Security and Medicare. Our economy and prosperity are being held back by a looming black cloud caused by fear and uncertainty with regard government spending and the federal deficit.