Save Money in Retirement

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

There are many ways to stretch your retirement dollars without dramatically impacting your lifestyle.  Start by evaluating what is of great importance to you.  Create a plan that encourages you to spend on things and experiences that are important to you and helps you reduce expenses in low priority areas.

Depending on your priorities, a decrease in housing expenses may provide tremendous cost savings.   If you live in a city with a high cost of living, consider relocating to a lower cost city – ideally one closer to family.  According to Forbes, some of the most affordable cities in 2014 include Knoxville, Birmingham, Tampa, Virginia Beach and Oklahoma City. 

Downsizing is another great way to reduce expenses.  Now that you’re retired, your housing needs have probably changed.  Downsizing can help you reduce expenses on mortgage, insurance, taxes, utilities and maintenance.  In addition to saving money, you may be ready for a different lifestyle, a new floor plan (living on one level) and a new neighborhood that better meets your needs throughout retirement.

In retirement there are opportunities to save on vehicle expenses.  Assuming you are no longer commuting to work every day, you should be able to save on gas and maintenance for your vehicle.   Additionally, many retired couples don’t need two vehicles, selling a second car can save on car payments, insurance, taxes and maintenance. 

Vehicles are a depreciating asset where you can lose thousands of dollars by simply driving a car off the lot. Save money by resisting the temptation to buy a new car.  Internet sites such as Edmunds.com and Kelley Bluebook (kbb.com) make it easy to research prices to negotiate a good deal on a used vehicle.   Additionally, where possible, buy your vehicles with cash and avoid high interest car loans.

In retirement, you have more time to focus on saving money. Use this time to shop and compare, watch for specials and utilize coupons.  Evaluate your home, auto and health insurance and compare prices and features provided by different companies.  Save on cell phones, internet and television by comparing service offerings and negotiating prices.  Consider doing chores around the house that you previously hired someone else to do and cook more to save on eating out.

Having more time can also result in saving on travel expenses.  A more flexible schedule, allows you to avoid peak season and get reduced rates on airfare, lodging and restaurants.  May and September are great months to travel and get some good deals.  You can also save by flying during the week.   Travel sites such as Tripadvisor.com, Cheaptickets.com, RickSteves.com and Vacation Rental by Owner (VRBO.com) can also help maximize your travel dollar.

Finally, avoid the temptation to over spend on children and grandchildren.  You will probably need most of your money to cover retirement spending needs.  Give your family the gift of your love and time rather than your money.

Retirement Tips for All Ages

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

It’s always a challenge to balance between current obligations and saving for retirement.  A good start toward meeting your retirement goals is to get your financial house in order.  Create a spending plan that helps you live below your means.  Maintain an emergency fund of at least four months of expenses and pay off high interest consumer debt.    Establish a habit of saving at least 10% of your income.  If you are getting a late start, you may need to save 15-20% of your income.

Develop a retirement plan to determine how much you need to save on a monthly basis and how large a nest egg you will need to comfortably retire.  There are many on-line calculators available to help you run retirement numbers.  However, they are only as accurate as the data that you input and the assumptions that the model uses.  You may want to hire a fee-only financial planner to run some figures for you.

Work toward maximizing contributions to your employer’s retirement plan; take advantage of any employer match that may be provided.  Once you have contributed up to the level of your employer’s match, consider contributing to a Roth IRA.  A painless way to steadily increase your contribution percentage is to increase your contribution whenever you get a raise.  If you are self-employed, or your employer doesn’t offer a retirement plan, contribute to a SEP, Simple or an IRA.  If you are maxed out, increase your contributions as the maximum contribution limits increase or you become eligible for a catch-up contribution at age 50.

Invest your retirement funds in a diversified portfolio made up of a combination of stock and bond funds that invest in companies of different sizes, in different industries and in different geographies.  Generally, your retirement savings is long term money, so avoid emotional reactions to make sudden changes based on short term market fluctuations.  Develop an investment plan that meets your timeframe and investment risk tolerance and stick to it. 

Don’t use your retirement funds as a savings account for other financial objectives.  Unless you are in a dire emergency, don’t take distributions or borrow against your retirement funds.  When you change jobs, don’t cash out your retirement plans.  Roll your funds over to an IRA or a new employer’s plan.    Avoid sacrificing your retirement savings to fund college education for your children.

As you near retirement age, there are several ways to stretch your retirement dollars.  Retirement doesn’t have to be all or nothing.  Consider a gradual step down where you work a few days a week or on a project basis.   Try to time the payoff of your mortgage with your date of retirement.  Consider downsizing to a smaller home or moving to a more economical area.  Establish a retirement spending plan that provides funds for things you value and helps you avoid frivolous spending on things that don’t really matter.

Sure Fire Ways to Ruin Your Retirement Plan

 

 

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Managing your finances is a balancing act between spending for today and saving for the future.   It’s important to plan and save for retirement but the demands of everyday life frequently get in the way.  Here are some common pitfalls to avoid when planning for your retirement.

 

Living Beyond Your Means – Spending more than you earn, failing to save and going into debt can be huge threats to your financial security and retirement plans.  Develop a spending plan that allows for an emergency fund and annual savings of 10-15% of your gross income.  Make a conscious decision to spend less money, buy a less expensive house and buy less expensive cars to keep your expenses below your income.  This can help you save for the future with a buffer for financial emergencies.

 

Failure to Participate – Participate in tax advantaged retirement plans for which you may be eligible.  Contribute to your employers 401k or 403b to take advantage of any employer match and deduct the contributions from your current income.  Additionally, if you are eligible, consider contributing to a Roth IRA.  Generally, an after tax Roth IRA contribution can grow tax free, with no tax due upon distribution.

 

Failure to Diversify – Maximize the potential for growing your retirement nest egg by maintaining a well-diversified portfolio designed to meet your unique risk tolerance and investment timeframe.  A common pitfall is the failure to monitor and rebalance your portfolio on an annual basis.   A portfolio that is too conservative can be as detrimental to your retirement plan as an overly aggressive portfolio.  Upon retirement, investors frequently make the mistake of changing their portfolio allocation to be extremely conservative, when they may live for another 30 to 40 years.

 

Market Timing and Trading on Emotion – Moving in and out of the stock market based on short term market fluctuations generally results in lower long term returns.   There is a natural inclination to buy when the economy is booming and sell when the economy is in the doldrums.   This usually results in buying high and selling low, which can be very detrimental to your portfolio.  To maximize your retirement portfolio avoid the emotional temptation to react to short term events and fluctuations in the market.

 

Funding College and Living Expenses for Grown Children at the Expense of Retirement – Avoid the pitfall of sacrificing your retirement to fund college education for your children or to make significant contributions toward an adult child’s living expenses.  Students have many options to finance or minimize college expenses but you can’t take out a loan to finance your retirement.

Cashing Out or Taking an Early Withdrawal – When you change jobs, transfer the money from your employer’s plan to another tax deferred plan such as a Rollover IRA.  This allows you to avoid paying significant income tax and a 10% early distribution penalty, if you are under 59 ½.

The Difference Between an Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA


One of the biggest decisions associated with saving for retirement is choosing between a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA. The primary difference between the two IRAs is when you pay income tax. A traditional IRA is usually funded with pre-tax dollars providing you with a current tax deduction. Your money grows tax deferred, but you have to pay regular income tax upon distribution. A Roth IRA is funded with after tax dollars, and does not provide a current tax deduction. Generally, a Roth IRA grows tax free and you don’t have to pay taxes on distributions. In 2013 you can contribute up to a total of $5,500 per year plus a $1,000 catch-up contribution if you are over 50. You can make a contribution into a combination of a Roth and a Traditional IRA as long as you don’t exceed the limit. You also have until your filing date, usually April 15th, to make a contribution for the previous year. New contributions must come from earned income.
There are some income restrictions on IRA contributions. In 2013, your eligibility to contribute to a Roth IRA begins to phase-out at a modified adjusted gross income of $112,000 if you file single and $178,000 if you file married filing jointly. With a traditional IRA, there are no limits on contributions based on income. However, if you are eligible for a retirement plan through your employer, there are restrictions on the amount you can earn and still be eligible for a tax deductible IRA. In 2013 your eligibility for a deductible IRA begins to phase out at $59,000 if you are single and at $95,000 if you file married filing jointly.
Generally, you cannot take distributions from a traditional IRA before age 59 ½ without a 10% penalty. Contributions to a Roth IRA can be withdrawn anytime, tax free. Earnings may be withdrawn tax free after you reach age 59 ½ and your money has been invested for at least five years. There are some exceptions to the early withdrawal penalties. You must start taking required minimum distributions on Traditional IRAs upon reaching 70 ½. Roth IRAs are not subject to required minimum distributions.
The decision on the type of IRA is based largely on your current tax rate, your anticipated tax rate in retirement, your investment timeframe, and your investment goals. A Roth IRA may be your best choice if you are currently in a low income tax bracket and anticipate being in a higher bracket in retirement. A Roth IRA may also be a good option if you already have a lot of money in a traditional IRA or 401k, and you are looking for some tax diversification. A Roth IRA can be a good option if you are not eligible for a deductible IRA but your income is low enough to qualify for a Roth IRA.

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