Investing is Not a Competition Between Stocks and Bonds

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Many investors think of investing as a competition between investing in the stock market, interest earning investments and real estate.  Too many people take a strong stance for or against one of these three broad categories rather than embracing the advantages that each one can bring to their portfolio.  A well balanced portfolio should include some of all three with each serving a very different purpose.

All three categories will have their day in the sun depending on the investment climate.  Due to low rates, interest earning investments such as CDs, bonds and savings accounts aren’t getting much love right now.   Despite the current low rates of return, interest earning investments provide a relatively safe place to keep your short term money.  This is money needed to cover living expenses or emergencies over the next several years.  Interest earning investments provide a buffer against more volatile investments in the stock and real estate markets.   Keeping a portion of your portfolio in safer, fixed income investments can give you greater peace of mind and help you stick to your long term plan when the stock market gets rocky.  However, avoid putting too much in interest earning investments; this can make it difficult to keep up with inflation and earn the growth needed to support your retirement goals.

On the other hand, when the stock market is doing well everyone wants to get a piece of the action. Avoid overloading your portfolio with stock when the market is skyrocketing.   Investments in the stock market can provide you with long term growth and a hedge against inflation.  Historically, the stock market has trended upward and over long periods of time has outperformed other investment categories.  However, in the short term the stock market can be very unpredictable and volatile and should only be used for long term needs – money that isn’t needed for five to ten years.  Keep your short term money in interest earning investments.

Real estate serves a dual purpose for most investors, it gives us a place to live and it provides us with an asset that usually appreciates over time.   In addition to your home, as your portfolio grows, you may want to consider additional real estate investments in mutual funds or rental property.  Like the stock market, real estate should be treated as a long term investment.  The real estate market can experience extreme downturns and commonly lacks the liquidity needed to cover short term needs.

These three categories of investments have their advantages and disadvantages.  Focus on the role the asset plays in your financial plan and avoid becoming overly comfortable and confident with a single category – it’s all about balance.  The appropriate amount in each category will vary over time and is dependent on your age, your financial goals, your cash flow needs and your risk tolerance.

Selecting the Right Asset Allocation

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

When investing money, one of the first decisions to be made is your asset allocation.  Asset allocation is the division of your assets into different types of investments such as stock mutual funds, bonds, real estate or cash.  In order to maximize the return on your portfolio it’s crucial to maintain a well-diversified asset allocation.  According to many financial experts, asset allocation may be your single most important investment decision, more important than the specific investments or funds that you select.

There is no one size fits all; the right asset allocation is based on your unique situation which may change as your circumstances or perspective changes.  Some major factors to consider include investment time horizon, the need for liquidity, risk tolerance, risks taken in other areas of your life and how much risk is required to achieve your goals.

Arriving at the appropriate asset allocation is largely a balance between risk and return.  If you want or need a higher return you will have to assume a higher level of risk.  If you have a long investment time horizon, you can take on more risk because you don’t need your money right away and you can ride out fluctuations in the market.  However, if you have a short time horizon you should minimize your risk so your money will be readily available.

If you want to minimize risk, invest in fixed income investments such as money market accounts, certificate of deposits, high quality bonds or short term bond funds.   If you are willing to take on more risk, with the expectation of getting higher returns, consider stock mutual funds.  Generally, avoid investing money needed in the next five years into the stock market.   However, the stock market is an excellent option for long term money.

Regardless of your situation, the best allocation is usually a combination of fixed income and stock mutual funds.  With a diversified portfolio you can take advantage of higher returns found in the stock market while buffering your risk and meeting short term needs with fixed income investments.

Once your target asset allocation is set, rebalance on annual basis to stay on target.   Rebalancing will automatically result in selling investments that are high and buying investments that are low.  Avoid changing your target allocation based on emotional reactions to short term market fluctuations.    Stick to your plan unless there are major changes in your circumstances.

If you are unsure where to start, a good rule of thumb is to subtract your age from 120 to arrive at the percentage you should invest in stock market.  In the past it was customary to subtract from 100 but this has increased as life expectancies and the time one spends in retirement have increased.   In the final analysis, select an asset allocation that meets your specific needs and gives you peace of mind.

More to Rental Property Than Meets the Eye

 

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

With low interest rates and the fear of another drop in the stock market, many people are looking for alternative ways to earn investment income.  Many investors find the tangible nature of real estate appealing.  Although real estate may seem like the logical alternative to stocks and bonds, investment in real estate can be very complex, time consuming, and wrought with risk. 

Before buying, perform a realistic cash flow analysis on the income and expenses associated with the property you are considering.  Begin with start-up expenses associated with acquiring the property, including the down payment and any necessary improvements. Next tabulate the routine expenses that you will incur with a rental.  These may include mortgage payments, insurance, property taxes, home owner’s association dues, routine maintenance, and legal and accounting fees.  As a rule of thumb, maintenance and repairs run about 1-2% of the market value of your home, depending on the home’s condition.  Also consider an emergency fund to cover large unexpected repairs. 

Managing rental real estate can be very time consuming.  Seriously think about whether you want to manage the rental yourself or you want to hire a property manager.  Do you have the time and the desire to manage the property? If you do it yourself, you will need to market the property, evaluate potential renters, maintain the property, respond to tenant issues, collect rent payments and potentially evict tenants.   You also may want to learn about fair housing laws, code requirements, lease agreements, escrow requirements, and eviction procedures.  If you don’t have the time or the temperament to manage the property, consider hiring a property manager.  Property management fees usually run about 10-12% of rental income.

Some additional risks to consider when renting property include the possibility of major damage inflicted by a tenant, drawn out eviction processes, and law suits for negligence and safety issues.

After evaluating your expenses, do some income projections.  Research rents paid for similar properties in your target neighborhood.   Be sure to incorporate a reasonable vacancy rate.  According to the Colorado Division of Housing, the average vacancy rate in Colorado Springs has been about 6%, for the last 4 quarters.

Include the tax benefit of deducting depreciation into your analysis.  To calculate annual depreciation, divide the initial value of your rental home, not including land, by 27.5.  Unfortunately, you will probably have to recapture (repay to the IRS) this deduction upon sale of the property at a maximum rate of 25%.

Subtract your projected expenses from your projected income to determine your net profit.  Will the net profit you expect to gain from the property compensate you for your capital, time and risk?  In addition to the profit from rental income, be sure to factor appreciation of your property into your analysis.  Additionally, if you have a mortgage, your equity will increase every year as you pay off your mortgage.