Timeless Tips for Investment Success

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

You don’t need to employ a lot of sophisticated techniques and strategies to become a successful investor.  The most effective tools for investment success are simplicity, patience, and discipline.  Below are some guidelines to help you get the most from your investments.

Invest for the long term.  Evaluate your situation, set some goals, create a plan and stick with it.   Keep money that you may need for emergencies and short term living expenses in less volatile investments such as money market accounts, CDs and bonds.   Investments in the stock market should be limited to money that isn’t needed for at least 5 years.  If you keep a long term perspective with the money invested in the stock market you will be less likely to react to short term fluctuations.

Maintain a diversified portfolio.  Your portfolio should be comprised of a variety of different types of investments including stocks, bonds and cash.  The stock portion of your portfolio should include stock mutual funds that invest in companies of different sizes, in different industries and in different geographies.  Don’t chase the latest hot asset class and don’t act on the hot stock tip your buddy shared with you at happy hour.  Create a diversified portfolio and rebalance on an annual basis.  It’s also advisable to avoid investing more than 5% in a single security.

Don’t Time the Market.  Many studies have found that market timing just does not work and can be detrimental to your portfolio.  The so-called experts really have no idea what the market is going to do.  Many analysts earn a living by projecting future market fluctuations when in reality they are no better at predicting the future than you or me.  Peter Lynch sums it up perfectly with the following quote – “More money has been lost by investors preparing for corrections, or trying to anticipate corrections, than has been lost in corrections themselves.”

Keep Your Emotions in Check. The stock market is volatile and there will be years with negative returns.   Limit investment in the stock market to money you won’t need for several years.  Have patience and stay the course.  As experienced after the 2008 correction, the market will eventually rebound.  Don’t succumb to media hype and fear tactics claiming things are different this time. There have always been, and always will be, major events that trigger dramatic fluctuations in the stock market.  Don’t panic this will pass.  Sir John Templeton once said, “The four most dangerous words in investing are: “This Time is Different!”

Be tax smart but don’t let taxes drive your portfolio.  Where possible maximize the use of tax advantaged retirement vehicles such as 401k plans and Roth IRAs.  Place investments with the greatest opportunity for long term growth in tax deferred or tax free retirement accounts.   Save taxes where it makes sense but don’t intentionally sacrifice return just to save a few dollars in taxes.

Don’t Let Emotions Derail Your Investment Portfolio

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Emotions may be the single biggest detriment to your investment success.  We try to approach investments from a logical perspective but we are emotional creatures and money can stir-up intense feelings. The most common emotions are fear and greed which can lead us to overreact and sell low when the market is down and buy high when the market is at a peak.  Both actions are harmful to the performance of your investment portfolio. We can’t ignore emotions but we can better understand our emotional triggers and learn how to manage them.

You can minimize emotional reactions to fluctuations in the stock market by creating a plan.   With some planning you can establish a diversified asset allocation that incorporates your investment timeframe, financial goals and tolerance for risk.  A well designed asset allocation can ensure that money needed in the short term is placed in safer fixed income investments while long term money is invested in higher return, higher risk investments like stock mutual funds.   As a general rule, money needed in the next five years should not be invested in the stock market.  If you position your short term money in safer, less volatile investments such as money markets, CDs and bonds, you will be less likely to overreact   and act on emotion.

When you invest in the stock market prepare yourself for volatility including some years with negative returns.  Over long periods of time, the average return in the stock market has been around 9%, much higher than the average return for fixed income investments.  However, stock market returns are not level.  In some years, stock market returns will be higher than average and some years they will be lower than average. If you are prepared for this and maintain a long time horizon you will be more likely to stay on course.

Be wary of sensational news reports that claim the world is coming to an end and everything is different this time.  The stock market goes through cycles and there will always be scandals, bubbles and crises getting blown out of proportion by the media, financial pundits or financial companies trying to sell you something.  An example of this is commercials that use fear tactics to encourage you to buy gold and silver. They prey on the fear and uncertainty investors experience during a significant market drop.

Buying on emotion can also be detrimental to the long term performance of your portfolio.  We have a natural fear of missing an opportunity.  Avoid chasing the latest hot asset class or following the crowd because you don’t want to miss out.  Assets performing well this year may be next year’s losers and investments with abnormally high returns aren’t sustainable.  Don’t get swept up in the euphoria, keep your portfolio diversified where assets that perform well this year can buffer against those that aren’t performing well.

Slow and steady wins every time!

The Pitfalls of Market Timing

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Market timing is one of the most detrimental ways an investor can negatively impact his stock market returns. History shows that investors do not effectively time the market. For the last nine years, DALBAR, Inc., a market research firm, has conducted an annual study on market returns called the Quantitative Analysis of Investor Behavior (QAIB). This study has consistently found that returns earned by the individual investor are significantly below that of the stock market indices. The 2013 QAIB report found that during the 20 year period between 1998 and 2012, the average mutual fund investor lagged the stock market indices by 3.96%. This is a significant improvement over the period between 1991 and 2010, in which the average investor lagged the mutual fund indices by 5.1%. According to Dalbar, “No matter what the state of the mutual fund industry, boom or bust: Investment results are more dependent on investor behavior than on fund performance. Mutual fund investors who hold on to their investments are more successful than those who time the market.”
The stock market is counterintuitive in that the best time to sell is usually when the market seems to be doing well, and the best time to buy is usually when the market is doing poorly. As investors, our decisions are frequently driven by emotion rather than cognitive reasoning. We frequently overreact to emotions of fear and greed which throws numberswiki.com

us onto an investment roller coaster. When the stock market goes up we start to feel more and more optimistic, and as the market rises higher we get caught up in a state of euphoria. Our sense of greed kicks in and we don’t want to miss the opportunity to make money, so we buy when the market is high. The market may stay up for a while but eventually the economic cycle changes and stock prices start to drop. Initially we rationalize that this is temporary, or just a minor correction. As the market continues to drop we become more and more concerned. Soon our sense of fear kicks in, we start to panic and we sell at the wrong time. If we don’t recognize the dangers of this emotion driven cycle we are deemed to repeat it.
In addition to our intrinsic emotional response, we are bombarded by sensationalized news and advertising campaigns to influence us to change the course of our investment strategy. Don’t get caught up in the hype about the next big investment craze. Your best course of action is to develop and follow an investment strategy that supports your tolerance for risk and investment timeframe. The stock market is volatile and is best suited for long term investing. Time is needed to absorb fluctuations in the market. Keep short term money in fixed income investments. You will be less tempted to time the market in a well-diversified portfolio specifically designed for your investment time horizon.

Tips to Acheive Financial Fitness

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA


The first step toward financial fitness is to understand your current situation and live within your means. Review your actual expenses on an annual basis and categorize your expenses as necessary or discretionary. Compare your expenses to your income and develop a budget to ensure you are living within your means and saving for the future. The next step is to pay off high interest credit cards and personal debts. Once you have paid off your credit cards, create and maintain an emergency fund equal to about four months of expenses, including expenses for the current month. Your emergency funds should be readily accessible in a checking, savings or money market account.
Now it’s time to look toward the future. Get in the habit of always saving at least 10% to 15% of your gross income. Think about your goals and what you want to accomplish. If you don’t own a home, you may want to save for a down payment. When you purchase a home make sure you can easily make the payments while contributing toward retirement. Generally, your mortgage expense should be at or below 25% of your take home pay.
Contribute money into retirement plans, for which you qualify. Make contributions to your 401k plan, at least up to the employer match and maximize your Roth IRA. If you are self-employed, consider a SEP or a Simple plan. If you have children and want to contribute to their college expenses, consider a 529 college savings plan. Do not contribute so much toward your children’s college fund that you sacrifice your own retirement.
As you save for retirement, be an investor not a trader. Investing in the stock market is a long term endeavor, forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market is fruitless. Avoid emotional reactions to headlines and short term events. Don’t overreact to sensationalistic stories or chase the latest investment trends. Establish a defensive position by maintaining a well-diversified portfolio, custom designed for your unique situation. Slow and steady wins the race!
Don’t invest in anything that you don’t understand or that sounds too good to be true. If you really want to invest in complicated products, read the fine print. Be especially aware of high commissions, fees, and surrender charges. There is no free lunch; if you are being offered above market returns, there is probably a catch. Keep in mind that contracts are written to protect the insurance or investment company, not the investor.
It is impossible to predict fluctuations in the market or to select the next great stock. However, you can hedge your bets with a well-diversified portfolio. Establish an asset allocation that is aligned with your goals, investment timeframe, and risk tolerance. Your portfolio should contain a mix of fixed income and stock based investments across a wide variety of companies and industries. Rebalance your portfolio on an annual basis to stay diversified.

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