Tips from the Wealthy on How to Get Rich

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

You don’t have to be incredibly intelligent and born into the Rockefeller family to attain wealth.   Below are some pointers commonly shared by wealthy people on how to manage your life and your money to reach financial independence.  There is no magic, achieving financial security involves straight forward, common sense actions to gradually build your net worth.

  1. Write Down Your Goals: It’s great to dream about what you want to achieve but to accomplish something you need to put your goals into writing and create an action plan to attain them.
  2. Control Your Expenses: Take the time to understand and manage your expenses and create a budget that supports your goals.   Spend less than you earn and develop good saving habits.  Keep your expenses in check when things are going well and avoid automatically increasing your expenses as your income grows.
  3. Don’t Buy Status: Don’t buy things to look rich or to impress your friends.  Most wealthy people drive older model used vehicles and live in modest homes.  Use your money to save for the future and spend on what really matters.
  4. Educate Yourself: Getting a good education and selecting the right career is a huge factor in attaining wealth.  A good education can result in a more rewarding job in a field you enjoy.  If you enjoy your work you are more likely to excel and earn more money.  If you are in a dead end job or a career you don’t enjoy consider going back to school to transition into a career for which you have more passion.
  5. Be Patient and Maintain a Long Term Perspective – The key to successful investing is having the patience to ride out fluctuations in the market. Resist the temptation to chase returns and time the market.  Invest for the long term and let your portfolio grow over time.  Stay the course and avoid making decisions triggered by emotions.
  6. Manage Risk and Return – Balance your desire for high return with the risk involved. Maintain a diversified portfolio with adequate short term liquidity to get you through rough spots in the market.   Rebalance on an annual basis to keep your portfolio diversified.  Take a disciplined approach to investing and avoid high risk investments that promise a return that may be too good to be true.
  7. Start your own business – According to Forbes nearly all of the people on their list of billionaires made their money through involvement with a business they or their family had started. Owning your own business may seem too risky but it can provide you with an opportunity for higher earnings and greater control over your financial future.
  8. Avoid Complex Investments – Avoid investing in anything that seems overly complicated or that you don’t fully understand. Complex investments often come with  greater risk, a lack of control, limited marketability, limited transparency and hidden fees.

Most Effective Investment Approach Combination of Male and Female Traits

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Numerous studies have found that men and women generally approach investing differently.  Generalizations can be dangerous but there is ample evidence to indicate there are some common gender traits that may hinder our investment performance.  An increased awareness of our potential strengths and weaknesses may help us to adjust our behavior for a better outcome.

Studies have found that men are more confident than women when it comes to investing.  According to Meir Statman, professor of finance with Santa Clara University, “Women tend to be less overconfident than men.  In the stock market, where so much is random, trying to do better than average is more likely to get you results that are below average.  This really is where all the confidence is going to hurt you”.  On the positive side confidence can prompt you to make a decision and take action, but overconfidence can result in taking too much risk and investing in things you don’t know enough about.  A lack of confidence can result in taking too little risk and a reluctance to take action.

In another study conducted by Brad M. Barber, professor at UC Davis and Terrance Odean, professor at UC Berkeley, researchers found that overconfidence leads men to trade excessively.  As a result their returns suffer more than women’s.  But women and men sell securities indiscriminately;    women just do it less often, so their performance doesn’t suffer as much.

According to the 2010 study by the Boston Consulting Group, women have a tendency to focus more on long term goals.  Their investment strategy and risk tolerance revolves around long term goals and financial security.  Men have more of a business orientation and tend to be more focused on efficient transactions and short term performance.  Men are likely to be more competitive and thrill seeking in nature which can lead to a focus on short term returns.  Women’s longer time horizon may help them to prepare for retirement but if they are overly concerned with security they may not take enough risk to earn the investment returns needed to meet retirement needs.

Additionally, the Blackrock Investor Pulse Survey of 4,000 Americans found that 48% of women describe themselves as knowledgeable about saving and investing vs. 57% of men.  Women generally felt less confident making investment decisions and investing in the stock market.  Typically women were likely to do more research, take more time to make investment decisions, use more self-control and stay the course.

Studies have also indicated women enjoy learning about investments in a group setting and men are more likely to be independent learners.  Women are also more receptive to financial research and advice.

The best approach to successful investing is a blend of habits commonly practiced by both men and women.  Identify your personal biases and tendencies and make adjustments to achieve optimal investment results.

Timeless Tips for Investment Success

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

You don’t need to employ a lot of sophisticated techniques and strategies to become a successful investor.  The most effective tools for investment success are simplicity, patience, and discipline.  Below are some guidelines to help you get the most from your investments.

Invest for the long term.  Evaluate your situation, set some goals, create a plan and stick with it.   Keep money that you may need for emergencies and short term living expenses in less volatile investments such as money market accounts, CDs and bonds.   Investments in the stock market should be limited to money that isn’t needed for at least 5 years.  If you keep a long term perspective with the money invested in the stock market you will be less likely to react to short term fluctuations.

Maintain a diversified portfolio.  Your portfolio should be comprised of a variety of different types of investments including stocks, bonds and cash.  The stock portion of your portfolio should include stock mutual funds that invest in companies of different sizes, in different industries and in different geographies.  Don’t chase the latest hot asset class and don’t act on the hot stock tip your buddy shared with you at happy hour.  Create a diversified portfolio and rebalance on an annual basis.  It’s also advisable to avoid investing more than 5% in a single security.

Don’t Time the Market.  Many studies have found that market timing just does not work and can be detrimental to your portfolio.  The so-called experts really have no idea what the market is going to do.  Many analysts earn a living by projecting future market fluctuations when in reality they are no better at predicting the future than you or me.  Peter Lynch sums it up perfectly with the following quote – “More money has been lost by investors preparing for corrections, or trying to anticipate corrections, than has been lost in corrections themselves.”

Keep Your Emotions in Check. The stock market is volatile and there will be years with negative returns.   Limit investment in the stock market to money you won’t need for several years.  Have patience and stay the course.  As experienced after the 2008 correction, the market will eventually rebound.  Don’t succumb to media hype and fear tactics claiming things are different this time. There have always been, and always will be, major events that trigger dramatic fluctuations in the stock market.  Don’t panic this will pass.  Sir John Templeton once said, “The four most dangerous words in investing are: “This Time is Different!”

Be tax smart but don’t let taxes drive your portfolio.  Where possible maximize the use of tax advantaged retirement vehicles such as 401k plans and Roth IRAs.  Place investments with the greatest opportunity for long term growth in tax deferred or tax free retirement accounts.   Save taxes where it makes sense but don’t intentionally sacrifice return just to save a few dollars in taxes.

Don’t Let Emotions Derail Your Investment Portfolio

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Emotions may be the single biggest detriment to your investment success.  We try to approach investments from a logical perspective but we are emotional creatures and money can stir-up intense feelings. The most common emotions are fear and greed which can lead us to overreact and sell low when the market is down and buy high when the market is at a peak.  Both actions are harmful to the performance of your investment portfolio. We can’t ignore emotions but we can better understand our emotional triggers and learn how to manage them.

You can minimize emotional reactions to fluctuations in the stock market by creating a plan.   With some planning you can establish a diversified asset allocation that incorporates your investment timeframe, financial goals and tolerance for risk.  A well designed asset allocation can ensure that money needed in the short term is placed in safer fixed income investments while long term money is invested in higher return, higher risk investments like stock mutual funds.   As a general rule, money needed in the next five years should not be invested in the stock market.  If you position your short term money in safer, less volatile investments such as money markets, CDs and bonds, you will be less likely to overreact   and act on emotion.

When you invest in the stock market prepare yourself for volatility including some years with negative returns.  Over long periods of time, the average return in the stock market has been around 9%, much higher than the average return for fixed income investments.  However, stock market returns are not level.  In some years, stock market returns will be higher than average and some years they will be lower than average. If you are prepared for this and maintain a long time horizon you will be more likely to stay on course.

Be wary of sensational news reports that claim the world is coming to an end and everything is different this time.  The stock market goes through cycles and there will always be scandals, bubbles and crises getting blown out of proportion by the media, financial pundits or financial companies trying to sell you something.  An example of this is commercials that use fear tactics to encourage you to buy gold and silver. They prey on the fear and uncertainty investors experience during a significant market drop.

Buying on emotion can also be detrimental to the long term performance of your portfolio.  We have a natural fear of missing an opportunity.  Avoid chasing the latest hot asset class or following the crowd because you don’t want to miss out.  Assets performing well this year may be next year’s losers and investments with abnormally high returns aren’t sustainable.  Don’t get swept up in the euphoria, keep your portfolio diversified where assets that perform well this year can buffer against those that aren’t performing well.

Slow and steady wins every time!

The Pitfalls of Market Timing

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Market timing is one of the most detrimental ways an investor can negatively impact his stock market returns. History shows that investors do not effectively time the market. For the last nine years, DALBAR, Inc., a market research firm, has conducted an annual study on market returns called the Quantitative Analysis of Investor Behavior (QAIB). This study has consistently found that returns earned by the individual investor are significantly below that of the stock market indices. The 2013 QAIB report found that during the 20 year period between 1998 and 2012, the average mutual fund investor lagged the stock market indices by 3.96%. This is a significant improvement over the period between 1991 and 2010, in which the average investor lagged the mutual fund indices by 5.1%. According to Dalbar, “No matter what the state of the mutual fund industry, boom or bust: Investment results are more dependent on investor behavior than on fund performance. Mutual fund investors who hold on to their investments are more successful than those who time the market.”
The stock market is counterintuitive in that the best time to sell is usually when the market seems to be doing well, and the best time to buy is usually when the market is doing poorly. As investors, our decisions are frequently driven by emotion rather than cognitive reasoning. We frequently overreact to emotions of fear and greed which throws numberswiki.com

us onto an investment roller coaster. When the stock market goes up we start to feel more and more optimistic, and as the market rises higher we get caught up in a state of euphoria. Our sense of greed kicks in and we don’t want to miss the opportunity to make money, so we buy when the market is high. The market may stay up for a while but eventually the economic cycle changes and stock prices start to drop. Initially we rationalize that this is temporary, or just a minor correction. As the market continues to drop we become more and more concerned. Soon our sense of fear kicks in, we start to panic and we sell at the wrong time. If we don’t recognize the dangers of this emotion driven cycle we are deemed to repeat it.
In addition to our intrinsic emotional response, we are bombarded by sensationalized news and advertising campaigns to influence us to change the course of our investment strategy. Don’t get caught up in the hype about the next big investment craze. Your best course of action is to develop and follow an investment strategy that supports your tolerance for risk and investment timeframe. The stock market is volatile and is best suited for long term investing. Time is needed to absorb fluctuations in the market. Keep short term money in fixed income investments. You will be less tempted to time the market in a well-diversified portfolio specifically designed for your investment time horizon.

Tips to Acheive Financial Fitness

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA


The first step toward financial fitness is to understand your current situation and live within your means. Review your actual expenses on an annual basis and categorize your expenses as necessary or discretionary. Compare your expenses to your income and develop a budget to ensure you are living within your means and saving for the future. The next step is to pay off high interest credit cards and personal debts. Once you have paid off your credit cards, create and maintain an emergency fund equal to about four months of expenses, including expenses for the current month. Your emergency funds should be readily accessible in a checking, savings or money market account.
Now it’s time to look toward the future. Get in the habit of always saving at least 10% to 15% of your gross income. Think about your goals and what you want to accomplish. If you don’t own a home, you may want to save for a down payment. When you purchase a home make sure you can easily make the payments while contributing toward retirement. Generally, your mortgage expense should be at or below 25% of your take home pay.
Contribute money into retirement plans, for which you qualify. Make contributions to your 401k plan, at least up to the employer match and maximize your Roth IRA. If you are self-employed, consider a SEP or a Simple plan. If you have children and want to contribute to their college expenses, consider a 529 college savings plan. Do not contribute so much toward your children’s college fund that you sacrifice your own retirement.
As you save for retirement, be an investor not a trader. Investing in the stock market is a long term endeavor, forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market is fruitless. Avoid emotional reactions to headlines and short term events. Don’t overreact to sensationalistic stories or chase the latest investment trends. Establish a defensive position by maintaining a well-diversified portfolio, custom designed for your unique situation. Slow and steady wins the race!
Don’t invest in anything that you don’t understand or that sounds too good to be true. If you really want to invest in complicated products, read the fine print. Be especially aware of high commissions, fees, and surrender charges. There is no free lunch; if you are being offered above market returns, there is probably a catch. Keep in mind that contracts are written to protect the insurance or investment company, not the investor.
It is impossible to predict fluctuations in the market or to select the next great stock. However, you can hedge your bets with a well-diversified portfolio. Establish an asset allocation that is aligned with your goals, investment timeframe, and risk tolerance. Your portfolio should contain a mix of fixed income and stock based investments across a wide variety of companies and industries. Rebalance your portfolio on an annual basis to stay diversified.

Here Are Three Simple Secrets to Investment Success

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Build a Portfolio to Support Your Investment Timeframe

Investment timeframe is a major consideration in developing an investment portfolio.  Start with an emergency fund covering about four months of expenses in a cash account with immediate access.  Next, put aside money that is needed over the next few years into fixed income vehicles such as CDs, bonds or bond funds.  Invest long term money into a combination of “stock based” mutual funds and fixed income investments based on your tolerance for investment risk and volatility.  Historically, stock has significantly out-performed fixed income investments but can be volatile during shorter timeframes.  Stock is a long term investment; avoid putting money needed within the next five years in the stock market.

Diversify, Diversify, Diversify

Once your emergency fund is established and funds have been put away for short term needs, it’s time to create a well-diversified investment portfolio.   We cannot predict the next hot asset class but we can create a portfolio that will capitalize on asset categories that are doing well and buffer you from holding too much in asset categories that are lagging.  Think of the pistons in a car, as the value of one asset is increasing the other may be falling.  Ideally, the goal of a well-diversified portfolio is to have assets that move in opposite directions, to reduce volatility, while following a long term upward trend.  It is advisable to diversify based on the type of asset, investment objective, company size, location and tax considerations.

Avoid Emotional Decisions and Market Timing

The best laid plans are worthless if we succumb to our emotions and overreact to short term economic news.  Forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market and trying to time the market is fruitless.   We can’t control or predict how the stock market will perform but we can establish a defensive position to deal with a variety of outcomes.  This is accomplished by maintaining a well-diversified portfolio that supports our goals and investment time horizon. 

The stock market can trigger our emotions of fear and greed.  When things are going well and stock prices are high we become exuberant and want a piece of the action.   When things are bad and stock prices are low we become discouraged and want to get out before we lose it all.  The stock market is counterintuitive, generally the best time to buy is when the market is low and we feel disillusioned and the best time to sell is when the market is riding high and we feel optimistic.  We need to fight the natural inclination to make financial decisions based on emotions.   Don’t let short term changes in current events drive your long term investment decisions.

No one knows what the future holds so focus on what you can control.  Three steps toward this goal are to create a portfolio that meets your investment time horizon, create and maintain a diversified portfolio and avoid emotional decisions and market timing.

 

 

O’Connor: Investors urged not to panic as U.S. default looms

Last Updated: July 27. 2011 1:00AM

Brian J. O’Connor

O’Connor: Investors urged not to panic as U.S. default looms

Many doubt leaders, in the end, will fail to act, trigger default

With the deadline to raise the federal debt ceiling drawing closer by the day — and the risk that the U.S. could default on its sovereign debt growing — individual financial planners are fielding lots of calls from worried investors.

A failure to raise the debt ceiling that prompts a U.S. default would cause stock and bond prices to plummet, interest rates to rise, credit for mortgages, cars and other debt to pucker up, and knock the wobbly economic recovery flat on its face. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke himself has warned that letting the federal government run out of money would be “catastrophic.”

Nonetheless, advisers say individual investors should stick to their investment strategies for three good reasons:

First, most planners doubt that even the kinds of people who get elected to Congress these days will really allow the U.S. to default on its debt.

Second, in the case of a cataclysmic financial disaster, the traditional safe havens, such as U.S. Treasuries and even greenbacks, would take a hit.

And third, most individual investors just bungle it when they try to time when to enter and exit the stock market. “You’ve got to know when to sell but when to buy back in, too,” says Lyle Wolberg, a certified financial planner with Telemus Capital Partners in Southfield. “So you’ve got to be right twice. And that’s hard to do.”

Financial experts all agree that a U.S. debt default would be a serious, serious issue. But would it be as big as the worst global crash since the Great Depression? After all, the Dow Jones index has recovered nearly 90 percent of its record high from late 2007, at the peak of the real estate bubble. So unless you’re sure a possible U.S. default would create another great recession, it may not be worth the cost and worry to start rearranging your investments.

And even if it is, a well-structured investment portfolio already is positioned to ride out those kinds of losses.

“The diversification we’ve had in place is to address all these issues, so there really are no moves to make,” says Bill Mack, a certified financial planner who runs William Mack & Associates in Troy. “If you’re in inappropriate investments now, especially if you’re too heavy into equities, I’d be concerned. But this is a short-term event and your portfolio should be geared toward long-term objectives.”

With bonds, stocks and even U.S. Treasuries taking a hit in a default, investors really don’t have many places to run. Some analysts have suggested Swiss francs, an investment that’s well beyond the means and expertise of most folks trying to protect a 401(k) or Individual Retirement Account. Other strategies — from the popular but very risky choice of gold, to moving from long-term to short-term bonds or switching to high-dividend-yielding blue-chip stocks — are common suggestions.

But those strategies have been in place for more than year now, as investors anticipated rising interest rates, more inflation or looked for safe income to replace low-yield Treasuries.

“There isn’t a whole lot you can do that hasn’t been covered by the markets,” says Karen Norman, a certified financial planner with Norman Financial Planning in Troy. “Positioning yourself other than running for cash is tremendously difficult.”

Even cash would lose some value as the dollar would decline after a default, making it more expensive to buy imported goods, including gasoline. The advantage would be that a switch to cash now would leave an investor positioned to go bargain-hunting when stocks slide after a default. But individual investors who make regular contributions to a 401(k) or IRA already buy more shares with every deduction from their paychecks or automated payment from the checking accounts, so they’re already positioned to buy low once stocks hit the skids, just as they’ve done throughout the entire downturn.

The reason to go to cash now, says Nina Preston, a certified financial planner with the Society for Lifetime Planning in Troy, is if you need a stable stash to cover your short-term income requirements, such as retirees who are counseled to hold three to five years worth of needed income in cash or equivalents. But if you need to do that, you’re already holding too much stock.

“If you need to flee to cash,” Preston says, “you should have been in cash to start with.”

The final drawback to moving your money around — even to cash — is that you’ll probably do the wrong thing, warns Mack.

“If people are adamant about going to cash, if they feel it in their bones that the world is coming to an end, at what point do they say, ‘It’s time to get back in?'” he asks. “Don’t tell me its when you feel better because that’s too late. It just doesn’t work to follow your gut feelings.”

The bottom line is that investors need a strategy that lets them ride out short-term economic woes, even if they’re self-inflicted by our own leaders.

“We’ve looked ahead and positioned ourselves the best way we can,” Norman says. “Now we need these folks in Washington to do their duty. That’s what we’re paying them to do.”

Which means that your best investment option is a very easy one — picking up the phone and placing a call to your congressman or congresswoman.

boconnor@detnews.com

 http://detnews.com/article/20110727/OPINION03/107270346/O-Connor–Investors-urged-not-to-panic-as-U.S.-default-looms#.TjMnDLApgnQ.email

10 Tips for Financial Success

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Jane M. Young CFP, EA

1. Set Goals –
Review your personal values, develop a personal strategic plan, establish specific goals for the next three years and identify action steps for the coming year.

2. Understand Your Current Situation –
Review your actual expenses over the last year and develop a budget or a cash flow plan for the next 12 months. Compare your expenses and your income to better understand your cash flow situation. Are you’re spending habits aligned with your goals? Can or should you be saving more?

3. Have sufficient Liquidity –
Maintain an emergency fund equal to at least four months of expenses in a fully liquid account. Additionally, I recommend having a secondary emergency fund equal to another three months of expenses in semi-liquid investments. Increase your liquidity if you have above average volatility in your life due to job instability, rental properties or other risk factors.

4. Always save at least 10% of your income –
Regardless of whether you are saving to fund your emergency fund or retirement you should always pay yourself first by saving at least 10% of your income. Most of us need to be saving closer to 15% to meet our retirement needs.

5. Pay-off Credit Cards and Consumer Debt –
Learn the difference between bad debt (credit cards) and good debt (fixed-rate home mortgage). Avoid the bad debt and take advantage of the leveraging power of good debt.

6. Take Advantage of the Leveraging Power of Owning Your Home –
Once you have established an emergency fund and have paid off your bad debt start saving for a down payment to purchase your own home.

7. Fully Fund Your Retirement Accounts be a tax smart investor –
Participate in tax advantaged retirement programs for which you qualify. Maximize your Roth IRA and 401k contribution take full advantage of any company match on your 401k. If you are self-employed consider a SEP or Simple plan. Always select investment vehicles that provide the most beneficial tax solution while meeting your investment objectives.

8. Be an Investor, Not a Trader. Don’t time the market and don’t let emotions drive your investment decisions –
Investing in the stock market is a long term endeavor, forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market is fruitless. Avoid emotional reactions to headlines and short-term events. Don’t overreact to sensationalistic journalists or chase the latest investment trends. You can establish a defensive position by maintaining a well diversified portfolio custom tailored to your unique situation. Slow and steady wins the race!
“Far more money has been lost by investors in preparing for corrections, or anticipating corrections, than has been lost in the corrections themselves.”  -Peter Lynch, author and former mutual fund manager with Fidelity Investments

9. Don’t Invest in anything you don’t understand and be aware of high fees and penalties –
If it sounds too good to be true and you just can’t get your head around it, don’t invest in it! If you want to invest in complicated products, read the fine print. Be aware of commissions, fees and surrender charges. Be especially wary of products with a contingent deferred sales charge. There is no free lunch, if you are being promised above market returns there is probably a catch. Keep in mind that contracts are written to protect the insurance or investment company not the investor.

10. Diversify, Diversify, Diversify – rebalance annually –
It is impossible to predict fluctuations in the market or to select the next great stock. However, you can hedge your bets by maintaining a well diversified portfolio. Establish an asset allocation that is aligned with your goals, investment timeframe and risk tolerance. You should have a good mix of fixed income and equity based investments. Your equity investments should be spread over a wide variety of large, small, domestic and international companies and industries. Re-balance your portfolio on an annual basis to stay diversified and weed out any underperforming investments.

The Demise of an Investment Portfolio – Emotions and Market Timing

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market and trying to time the market is fruitless. As in all areas of our lives, we can’t control what life throws at us but we can establish a defensive position to best deal with a variety of outcomes. When it comes to our investments, we accomplish this through diversification, dollar cost averaging, maintaining an emergency fund and staying the course. We need to fight the natural inclination to make financial decisions based on emotions. Don’t forget that the stock market is counter-intuitive. Generally, the best time to buy is when things seem really bad and the best time to sell is when things seem the brightest. But then again, we just never know. It is easy to get caught up in the fear or euphoria of the moment. But, keep in mind that emotional reactions to the market can have a devastating impact on your portfolio. The stock market is a long- term investment and we need to avoid reacting to short-term events.

Proof of this can be seen in a Dalbar study conducted in March of 2010 for the time period of 1/1/90 – 12/31/09. During this time the average return in the equity market was 8.8% but the average return for the individual investor was only 3.2%. This discrepancy is a result of investors trying to time the market or reacting emotionally to financial news and events. Below are two quotes that sum this up very well.

“Far more money has been lost by investors in preparing for corrections, or anticipating corrections, than has been lost in the corrections themselves.”
-Peter Lynch, author and former mutual fund manager with Fidelity Investments

“The idea that a bell rings to signal when investors should get into or out of the stock market is simply not credible. After nearly fifty years in this business, I do not know of anybody who has done it (time the market) successfully and consistently. I don’t even know anybody who knows anybody who has done it successfully and consistently”
– John Bogle, founder of Vanguard Investments

10 Investment Principles that Never Go Out of Style

Jane M. Young CFP, EA

Frequently people talk about how everything is different and we should change the way we invest. Yes, we have just experienced a very difficult year with some major changes in our economic situation. However, every time we go through a major market adjustment if feels like “this time is different”. We could take numerous comments made at the end of the last bear market and insert them into today’s headlines without missing a beat. I call this the “recency effect”; bad times always feel more desperate while we are experiencing them. We need to step back and look at the big picture; don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Good, sound investment fundamentals are still valid. Some people may reassess their tolerance for risk, start saving more money or cut back on their discretionary spending – but the following investment principals are good, time tested guidelines that everyone should follow in any market.

1. Don’t time the market – The stock market is counter-intuitive. Generally, it may be better to invest when things seem most dire and sell when everything is rosy. It is impossible to predict the movement of the stock market and history shows that those who do frequently miss out on big upswings.

2. Dollar Cost Average – This enables you to invest a set dollar amount every month or every quarter regardless of what the market does. As a result you buy more shares when the price is low and fewer when the market is high. Dollar cost averaging helps you mitigate risk because we don’t know what the stock market is going to do tomorrow.

3. Maintain at least 3 to 6 months of expenses in an emergency fund – This is especially important in difficult financial times when stock market values are low and unemployment is high. Unless you have a very secure job I currently recommend a 6 month emergency fund.

4. Don’t invest in anything you don’t understand – If you just can’t get your head around something after it’s been explained or you have done a reasonable amount of research don’t invest in it. If an investment opportunity is overly complicated something may be rotten in Denmark.

5. Don’t Chase Hot Asset Classes – Today international funds may be skyrocketing and tomorrow it may be small cap domestic stock funds. Don’t forget what happened to the stock market after the dot.com bubble burst.

6. Diversify, Diversify, Diversify – Everyone needs to diversify with a mix of fixed income and equity investments that is consistent with their own unique investment goals and objectives. Although most stocks dropped in unison over the last year, I still think there is value in diversifying between different types of stock mutual funds. I believe we will see some categories of stocks outpace others as the market rebounds. Depending on your risk tolerance, a small allocation in commodities and real estate may be advisable.

7. Don’t Make Emotional Decisions – Many investment decisions are triggered by fear and greed and they are equally damaging. Don’t make rash decisions based on emotion. Remember the stock market is counter-intuitive.

8. Don’t put more than 5% of your assets in one security – Any given company can go bankrupt as we have seen with many financial and automobile firms over the last year. I encourage the use of mutual funds over individual stocks to help mitigate this type of risk. If you do invest in individual stocks don’t put too much faith in any one company. If you are investing in your own company and you have a strong understanding of the firm’s performance you could go up to 10%.

9. Be tax smart – Take advantage of tax advantaged retirement plans such as Roth IRAs and 401k plans. Consider tax consequences when re-balancing your portfolio. Use a bear market to harvest some tax losses and off-load some bad or inappropriate investments.

10. Be aware of fees and surrender charges – When selecting investments be aware of high fees and commissions. Tread cautiously with anything that contains a contingent deferred sales charge. Many clients have come to me with a desire to sell or transfer previously purchased investments, usually annuities, only to find they have a 5-10% surrender charge if they sell within ten years of purchase. A surrender charge can have a big impact on your flexibility. If you really want a variable annuity buy one with low fees and no surrender charges.