Strategically Withdraw Money for Retirement

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

After years of contributing money to 401k plans and Roth IRAs you are finally ready for retirement and face the dilemma of how to best withdraw your retirement savings.  Many retirees have several sources of income such as pensions, social security and real estate investments to help cover their retirement needs. Review your annual expenses and determine how much you need to pull from your nest egg for expenses that aren’t covered by other income sources.

One way to manage your retirement income needs is to create three buckets of money.  The first bucket is for money that will be needed in the next twelve months.  This money should be fully liquid in a checking, savings or money market account.  The second bucket is money that will be needed over the next five years.  At a minimum, hold money needed in the next five years in fixed income investments such as CDs and short term bond funds.  By investing this money in fixed income investments it is shielded from the fluctuations in the stock market; avoiding the agonizing possibility of having to sell stock mutual funds when the market is down.

Consider buying a rolling CD ladder where a CD covering one year of expenses will mature every year for the next four to five years.  After you spend your cash during the current year a new CD will mature to provide liquidity for the coming year.

The third bucket of money is your long term investment portfolio.  This should be a diversified portfolio made up of a combination stock mutual funds and fixed income investments.  Every year you will need to re-position investments from this bucket to your CD ladder or short term bond funds to cover five years of expenses.  Rebalance your long term portfolio on an annual basis to keep it well diversified.

In conjunction with positioning your asset allocation for short term needs, you need to decide from which account you should withdraw money.  Conventional wisdom tells us to draw down taxable accounts first to allow our retirement accounts to grow and compound tax deferred, for as long as possible.  Gains on money withdrawn from a taxable account are taxed at capital gains rates where withdrawals from a traditional retirement account are taxed at regular income tax rates and withdrawals from Roth IRAs are generally tax free.

Withdrawing all your money from taxable accounts first isn’t always the best solution.  You need to analyze your income tax situation and strategically manage your withdrawals to avoid unnecessarily going into a higher tax bracket.  Additionally, the taxation of Social Security is graduated based on income.  After starting Social Security, you may be able to minimize taxation of your benefit by taking withdrawals from a combination of taxable, traditional retirement and Roth accounts.  Do some tax and financial planning to strategically minimize taxes and maximize your retirement portfolio.

Should You Contribute to a Traditional 401(k) or a Roth 401(k)?

 

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Many large employers have started offering employees the choice between a traditional 401(k) and a Roth 401(k).  However, only a small percentage of employees have elected to contribute to a Roth 401(k).  The primary difference between the two plans is when you pay income taxes.  When you contribute to a traditional 401(k) your contribution is currently tax deductible, but you must pay regular income taxes on distributions taken in retirement.  Contributions to a Roth 401(k) are not currently deductible, but you pay no income taxes on distributions in retirement.  As with your traditional 401(k), your employer can match your Roth 401(k) contributions, but the match must go into a pre-tax account.  

There are several differences between a Roth 401(k) and a Roth IRA.  In 2014, annual contributions to a Roth IRA are limited to $5,500 plus a $1,000 catch-up contribution if you are 50 or over.  Contribution limits on Roth 401(k) plans are much higher at $17,500 plus a $5,500 catch-up contribution, if you are 50 or over.  Additionally, there are income limitations on your ability to contribute to a Roth IRA, and there no income restrictions on contributions to a Roth 401(k).   Additionally, upon reaching 70 ½ you must take a required minimum distribution from a Roth 401(k).   You are not required to take a distribution from a Roth IRA at 70 ½.  However, you do have the option to transfer your Roth 401(k) to a Roth IRA prior to 70 ½ to avoid this requirement. 

The decision on whether to invest in a Roth or traditional 401(k) depends primarily on when you want to pay taxes.  If you are currently in a low tax bracket and believe you will be in a higher tax bracket in retirement, a Roth account may be your best option.  On the other hand, if you are currently in a high tax bracket and you think you may be in a lower tax bracket in retirement, a traditional 401(k) could be your best option.  A Roth 401(k) is generally most appropriate for younger investors who are just getting started in their careers or someone who is experiencing a low income year.  People who are in their prime earning years may be better off taking the current tax deduction available with a traditional 401(k). 

Unfortunately, it’s difficult for most of us to know if our tax bracket will increase or decrease in retirement.  It is also hard to know if tax rates will increase before we reach retirement.  From a historical perspective, tax rates are currently low and some believe future rates will be increased to help cover the rising federal debt.  Amid this future uncertainty, your best option may be to split your contribution between a Roth and traditional 401(k).  This will give you some tax relief today and some tax diversification in retirement.

The Difference Between an Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA


One of the biggest decisions associated with saving for retirement is choosing between a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA. The primary difference between the two IRAs is when you pay income tax. A traditional IRA is usually funded with pre-tax dollars providing you with a current tax deduction. Your money grows tax deferred, but you have to pay regular income tax upon distribution. A Roth IRA is funded with after tax dollars, and does not provide a current tax deduction. Generally, a Roth IRA grows tax free and you don’t have to pay taxes on distributions. In 2013 you can contribute up to a total of $5,500 per year plus a $1,000 catch-up contribution if you are over 50. You can make a contribution into a combination of a Roth and a Traditional IRA as long as you don’t exceed the limit. You also have until your filing date, usually April 15th, to make a contribution for the previous year. New contributions must come from earned income.
There are some income restrictions on IRA contributions. In 2013, your eligibility to contribute to a Roth IRA begins to phase-out at a modified adjusted gross income of $112,000 if you file single and $178,000 if you file married filing jointly. With a traditional IRA, there are no limits on contributions based on income. However, if you are eligible for a retirement plan through your employer, there are restrictions on the amount you can earn and still be eligible for a tax deductible IRA. In 2013 your eligibility for a deductible IRA begins to phase out at $59,000 if you are single and at $95,000 if you file married filing jointly.
Generally, you cannot take distributions from a traditional IRA before age 59 ½ without a 10% penalty. Contributions to a Roth IRA can be withdrawn anytime, tax free. Earnings may be withdrawn tax free after you reach age 59 ½ and your money has been invested for at least five years. There are some exceptions to the early withdrawal penalties. You must start taking required minimum distributions on Traditional IRAs upon reaching 70 ½. Roth IRAs are not subject to required minimum distributions.
The decision on the type of IRA is based largely on your current tax rate, your anticipated tax rate in retirement, your investment timeframe, and your investment goals. A Roth IRA may be your best choice if you are currently in a low income tax bracket and anticipate being in a higher bracket in retirement. A Roth IRA may also be a good option if you already have a lot of money in a traditional IRA or 401k, and you are looking for some tax diversification. A Roth IRA can be a good option if you are not eligible for a deductible IRA but your income is low enough to qualify for a Roth IRA.

How to Pick an IRA That’s Right for You (via Credit.com)

One of the most common questions I hear from clients is whether they should invest in a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA. Let’s start with an understanding of the difference between the two. The biggest difference between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA is when you pay taxes. I like to think of it…


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A Money Moment with Jane – A Few Financial Planning Suggestions for the Fall

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By Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

  • Required Minimum Distributions were not required for 2009.  However, if you are at least 70½ you will be required to take a distribution in 2010.

 

  • If you are planning to convert some of your regular IRA to a Roth IRA, do so in 2010 to spread the taxes over 2011 and 2112.

 

  • Have you maximized your Roth IRA and 401k contribution?  The 2010 contribution limit for the Roth is $5,000 plus a $1,000 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.  The 2010 contribution limit for 401k plans is $16,500 plus a $5,500 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.

 

  • This is a good time to do some tax planning to make sure your withholdings or estimates are adequate to cover the taxes you will owe in April. 

 

  • Do you have any underperforming stocks or mutual funds that should be sold to take advantage of a tax loss in 2010?

 

  • Now is the time to go through your home for items to be donated to charity.  These can provide a nice deduction on your 2010 tax return.

 

  • Start planning for Christmas now and save money by working to a plan. 

 

To Convert or Not Convert – Looking Beyond the Roth IRA Conversion Calculator

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

As I mentioned in the previous article on Roth IRAs, with a Roth IRA you pay income tax now and not upon distribution. With a traditional IRA you defer taxes today and pay income taxes upon deferral. When you convert a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA you must pay regular income taxes on the amount that is converted. The advisability of converting to a Roth depends on the length of time you have until you take distributions, your tax rate today and your anticipated tax rate upon retirement and your projected return on your investments.

When you run your numbers through one of the numerous calculators available on the internet you may or may not see a big savings in doing a Roth Conversion. However, there are several other factors that may tilt the scale toward converting some of your money to a Roth.

• Income tax rates are currently very low and there is a general consensus that they will increase considerably by the time you start taking distributions. With a Roth conversion you pay the tax now at the lower rates and take tax free distributions when the tax rates are higher.

• The stock market is still down about 25% from where it was in August of 2008. There is a lot of cash sitting on the sidelines waiting to be invested once consumer confidence is restored. You can pay taxes on money in your traditional IRA while the share prices are low and take a tax free distribution from your Roth down the road when the market has rebounded.

• You may have a sizable portion of your portfolio in tax deferred retirement accounts on which you will have to take required minimum distributions (RMD). This could put you into a much higher tax bracket. By converting some of your traditional IRA into a Roth you can get some tax diversification on your portfolio. This will lower your RMD– because there is no RMD on a Roth IRA. Diversifying your portfolio between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA enables you to take your distributions from the most appropriate pot of money in any given year.

For more information on Roth IRAs and the new tax laws for 2010 please review the articles previously posted under Roth IRAs.

10 Investment Principles that Never Go Out of Style

Jane M. Young CFP, EA

Frequently people talk about how everything is different and we should change the way we invest. Yes, we have just experienced a very difficult year with some major changes in our economic situation. However, every time we go through a major market adjustment if feels like “this time is different”. We could take numerous comments made at the end of the last bear market and insert them into today’s headlines without missing a beat. I call this the “recency effect”; bad times always feel more desperate while we are experiencing them. We need to step back and look at the big picture; don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Good, sound investment fundamentals are still valid. Some people may reassess their tolerance for risk, start saving more money or cut back on their discretionary spending – but the following investment principals are good, time tested guidelines that everyone should follow in any market.

1. Don’t time the market – The stock market is counter-intuitive. Generally, it may be better to invest when things seem most dire and sell when everything is rosy. It is impossible to predict the movement of the stock market and history shows that those who do frequently miss out on big upswings.

2. Dollar Cost Average – This enables you to invest a set dollar amount every month or every quarter regardless of what the market does. As a result you buy more shares when the price is low and fewer when the market is high. Dollar cost averaging helps you mitigate risk because we don’t know what the stock market is going to do tomorrow.

3. Maintain at least 3 to 6 months of expenses in an emergency fund – This is especially important in difficult financial times when stock market values are low and unemployment is high. Unless you have a very secure job I currently recommend a 6 month emergency fund.

4. Don’t invest in anything you don’t understand – If you just can’t get your head around something after it’s been explained or you have done a reasonable amount of research don’t invest in it. If an investment opportunity is overly complicated something may be rotten in Denmark.

5. Don’t Chase Hot Asset Classes – Today international funds may be skyrocketing and tomorrow it may be small cap domestic stock funds. Don’t forget what happened to the stock market after the dot.com bubble burst.

6. Diversify, Diversify, Diversify – Everyone needs to diversify with a mix of fixed income and equity investments that is consistent with their own unique investment goals and objectives. Although most stocks dropped in unison over the last year, I still think there is value in diversifying between different types of stock mutual funds. I believe we will see some categories of stocks outpace others as the market rebounds. Depending on your risk tolerance, a small allocation in commodities and real estate may be advisable.

7. Don’t Make Emotional Decisions – Many investment decisions are triggered by fear and greed and they are equally damaging. Don’t make rash decisions based on emotion. Remember the stock market is counter-intuitive.

8. Don’t put more than 5% of your assets in one security – Any given company can go bankrupt as we have seen with many financial and automobile firms over the last year. I encourage the use of mutual funds over individual stocks to help mitigate this type of risk. If you do invest in individual stocks don’t put too much faith in any one company. If you are investing in your own company and you have a strong understanding of the firm’s performance you could go up to 10%.

9. Be tax smart – Take advantage of tax advantaged retirement plans such as Roth IRAs and 401k plans. Consider tax consequences when re-balancing your portfolio. Use a bear market to harvest some tax losses and off-load some bad or inappropriate investments.

10. Be aware of fees and surrender charges – When selecting investments be aware of high fees and commissions. Tread cautiously with anything that contains a contingent deferred sales charge. Many clients have come to me with a desire to sell or transfer previously purchased investments, usually annuities, only to find they have a 5-10% surrender charge if they sell within ten years of purchase. A surrender charge can have a big impact on your flexibility. If you really want a variable annuity buy one with low fees and no surrender charges.

Roth IRAs – Part II – The Major Differences Between a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

The primary difference between a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA is when you pay income tax. A traditional IRA and a traditional retirement plan are funded with pre-tax dollars and you pay taxes on your withdrawals. A Roth IRA is funded with after tax dollars and you don’t pay taxes on your withdrawals. The decision to buy a Roth or a Traditional IRA is largely based on your current and future tax rates, your investment timeframe and your investment goals. The Roth IRA is usually the more advantageous of the two options but it depends on your individual situation.

Traditional IRA: (tax me later)

• Funded with pre-tax dollars therefore it provides a current tax deduction
• Earnings are tax deferred
• Distributions taxed at regular income tax rates, penalty if withdrawn before 59 1/2
• Required minimum distributions must be taken beginning at age 70 1/2
• Income limit on contributions begins at, if participant is in a retirement plan, $89,000 MFJ and $55,000 if single.
• Annual contribution limit is $5000 if under 50 and $6000 if over 50
• Many IRAs are created as a result of a rollover from a company retirement plan such as a 401k – very similar in tax structure.

Roth IRA: (tax me now)

• Funded with after tax dollars, does not provide a current tax deduction
• Earnings tax exempt (after five years or 59 ½)
• Contributions can be withdrawn penalty and tax free
• Earnings can be withdrawn tax free after five years or 59 1/2
• No required minimum distribution
• Income limit on contribution begins at $166,000 MFJ and $105,000 if single
• Annual contribution limit is $5000 if under 50 and $6000 if over 50

Part III of this series will address the pros and cons of converting a Roth IRA to a Traditional IRA.

Start Planning Now! Income Limits on Roth IRA Conversions to be Lifted in 2010 – Part 1

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Beginning in January 2010 the income limit of $100,000 AGI (adjusted gross income) on converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA will be lifted. This is a huge opportunity for many who have been unable to contribute to a Roth or convert to a Roth due to income restrictions. Normally, when one converts a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA the amount converted is added to gross income in the year of conversion. However, for conversions made in 2010 the government is allowing you to spread out the payment of taxes over the 2011 and 2012 tax years.

Why should you care about this now, prior to 2010? There are several things you can do to prepare for this opportunity. This is a great time to fund your traditional IRA, non-deductible traditional IRA or your 401k plan, if you are planning to retire or change companies soon, in anticipation of converting it to a Roth in 2010. You will need cash to pay the taxes associated with converting to a Roth IRA, so you should be incorporating this additional need for liquidity into your financial planning today.

This is the first in a series of postings on Roth IRAs and Roth IRA conversions.

Three Significant Changes to Your Retirement Plans in 2009 and 2010

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

1. No required minimum distribution in 2009 for IRA, 401k, 403b, 457b, 401k and profit sharing plans. This does not apply to annuitized defined benefit plans.

2. If you are older than 70 ½, in 2009 you can make charitable gifts from your IRA without the payment being included in your adjusted gross income. The distribution must be a “qualified charitable distribution”, which means it must be made directly from the IRA owner to the charitable institution. This is especially beneficial if you claim a standard deduction and were unable to deduct charitable contributions by itemizing.

3. Beginning in 2010 individuals earning over $100,000 in modified adjusted gross income will be able to convert traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs. Modified adjusted gross income is the bottom line on the first page of the 1040 tax form. Income from a conversion in 2010 may be reported equally over 2011 and 2012.

While there are many benefits to converting from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA the conversion will increase your adjusted gross income (AGI) which can have some unintended consequences. An increase in AGI may impact the taxability of your social security, phase-outs on itemized deductions, education and your tax bracket.

I will write more about Roth IRA conversions in a future blog.