Give the Gift of Financial Wisdom this Christmas

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

This year, the best Christmas gift for your adult children may be the gift of financial wisdom. Unfortunately, most young adults successfully graduate from school without a practical understanding of personal finance.  Starting out with a solid foundation and some smart financial habits can help your children live a happier, more fulfilling life.

Upon graduation from school, young adults are starting with a blank slate.  They are probably accustomed to a frugal lifestyle that is more about friends and experiences than expensive cars and fancy restaurants.  Before they take on a host of new financial commitments, encourage them to establish a lifetime habit of living below their means and saving for the future.  Work with them to develop a budget, establish an emergency fund and save for the future.  Help them to avoid the common tendency to increase their expenses in lock step with their income.  They can experience more freedom and opportunity by living below their means and gradually increasing their standard of living.

Another concept that is not taught in school, is the difference between good and bad debt.  Help your children understand the danger of high interest rate credit cards and consumer debt.  Encourage them to limit the number of credit cards they use and to get in the habit of paying credit card balances in full every month.  Also explain the importance of establishing a good credit rating by paying their bills on time.  Help them understand that low interest, tax deductible mortgage debt can be useful where high interest credit card debt can be very detrimental to their financial security.

It’s also important for them to understand some basic investment concepts including the power of compounding.  For example, if they invest $100 per month for 30 years for a total investment of $36,000, in 30 years with a return of 6%, their money can grow to over $100,000 due to compounding.   They have the benefit of time! By investing early, they have tremendous opportunity to grow their money into a sizable nest egg by retirement.

Understanding the importance of diversification and the relationship between risk and return is also essential.  Encourage your kids to avoid putting all of their eggs in one basket and help them understand that getting a higher return requires taking more risk.  It’s best to invest in a variety of investment options with different levels of risk and return.  Caution them that anything that sounds too good to be true probably is.  There is no free lunch!

To augment the personal wisdom that you can share, consider buying your kids a book on personal finance for Christmas.  Some books to consider include The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason, Coin by Judy McNary, The Young Couples Guide to Growing Rich Together by Jill Gianola and the Wealthy Barber by David Chilton.

Don’t Let Emotions Derail Your Investment Portfolio

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Emotions may be the single biggest detriment to your investment success.  We try to approach investments from a logical perspective but we are emotional creatures and money can stir-up intense feelings. The most common emotions are fear and greed which can lead us to overreact and sell low when the market is down and buy high when the market is at a peak.  Both actions are harmful to the performance of your investment portfolio. We can’t ignore emotions but we can better understand our emotional triggers and learn how to manage them.

You can minimize emotional reactions to fluctuations in the stock market by creating a plan.   With some planning you can establish a diversified asset allocation that incorporates your investment timeframe, financial goals and tolerance for risk.  A well designed asset allocation can ensure that money needed in the short term is placed in safer fixed income investments while long term money is invested in higher return, higher risk investments like stock mutual funds.   As a general rule, money needed in the next five years should not be invested in the stock market.  If you position your short term money in safer, less volatile investments such as money markets, CDs and bonds, you will be less likely to overreact   and act on emotion.

When you invest in the stock market prepare yourself for volatility including some years with negative returns.  Over long periods of time, the average return in the stock market has been around 9%, much higher than the average return for fixed income investments.  However, stock market returns are not level.  In some years, stock market returns will be higher than average and some years they will be lower than average. If you are prepared for this and maintain a long time horizon you will be more likely to stay on course.

Be wary of sensational news reports that claim the world is coming to an end and everything is different this time.  The stock market goes through cycles and there will always be scandals, bubbles and crises getting blown out of proportion by the media, financial pundits or financial companies trying to sell you something.  An example of this is commercials that use fear tactics to encourage you to buy gold and silver. They prey on the fear and uncertainty investors experience during a significant market drop.

Buying on emotion can also be detrimental to the long term performance of your portfolio.  We have a natural fear of missing an opportunity.  Avoid chasing the latest hot asset class or following the crowd because you don’t want to miss out.  Assets performing well this year may be next year’s losers and investments with abnormally high returns aren’t sustainable.  Don’t get swept up in the euphoria, keep your portfolio diversified where assets that perform well this year can buffer against those that aren’t performing well.

Slow and steady wins every time!

Avoiding the Stock Market Can be a Risky

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

You may be hesitant to invest in the stock market because it feels too risky.  However, consider the risk you are taking with your financial future by avoiding the stock market.  The primary reason to invest in the stock market is the potential for a much higher return, especially in low interest rate environments.  Most of us need the potential for long term growth provided by the stock market to meet our retirement needs.  If you invest all of your money in fixed income you may struggle just to keep up with inflation and you run the risk of outliving your money.

Historically, stock market returns have been almost double those earned by bonds.  According to the Ibbotson SBBI (stock, bonds, bills and inflation) report, between 1926 and 2014 the average annual return on Small Stock was 12.3%, Large Stock was 10.1%, Government Bonds was 5.5%, Treasury Bills was 3.5% and Inflation was 3%.  This illustrates that investing at least some of your portfolio in stock can provide a much greater opportunity than fixed income to meet your financial goals.

Investing in the stock market is not without risk.  As with all investments, we must take on greater risk to earn a greater return.  However, there are many ways to help manage the volatility of the stock market.  Before investing in stocks make sure your financial affairs are in order.  Pay off your credit cards, establish an emergency fund and put money that will be needed over the next five years into less volatile fixed income investments.  The stock market is for long term investing.  It can provide the opportunity to earn higher long term returns but you can count on some volatility along the way.  By creating a buffer to cover short term needs you will be less likely overreact to fluctuations in the market and sell when the market is down.

You can also buffer stock market risk by creating a well-diversified portfolio comprised of mutual funds invested in stocks or bonds from a variety of different size companies, different industries and a variety of different geographies.  Investing in a single company can be very risky but investment in mutual funds can reduce this risk.  When investing in mutual funds your money is combined with that of other investors and invested, by a professional manager, into a large number of stocks or bonds.  Investing in a large number of companies enables you to spread out your risk.

Dollar cost averaging, where you automatically invest a set amount on a regular basis – usually monthly or quarterly, can also reduce risk.  Rather than investing a large amount all at once, when the market may be high, you gradually invest over time.  With dollar cost averaging you buy more shares when the market is low and fewer shares when the market is high.

What is Financial Planning?

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

I’m sure you hear the term “Financial Planning” on a regular basis but you may not be sure what it really means.  Financial planning is an on-going, comprehensive process to manage your finances in order to meet your life goals.  The process includes evaluating where you are today, setting goals, developing an action plan to meet your goals and implementing the plan.  Once you have addressed all the areas of your financial plan you should go back and review them on a regular basis.

Financial planning should be comprehensive – covering all areas of your financial life.  The primary areas of your financial plan should include retirement planning, insurance planning, tax planning, estate planning and investment management.    Depending on your situation, your financial plan may also address areas such as budgeting and debt management, college funding, employee benefits, business planning and career planning.  Comprehensive Financial Planning is very thorough and can take a lot of time and energy to complete.  I recommend breaking it into bite size chucks that can be easily evaluated, understood and implemented over the course of time.  

You can work through the financial planning process with a comprehensive financial planner or you can tackle it on your own.  If you decide to hire a financial planner, I encourage you to work with Certified Financial Planner who has taken an oath to work on a fiduciary basis.  An advisor, who works as a fiduciary, takes an oath to put your interests first.

The first step of the financial planning process is to evaluate where you are today.  Tabulate how much money you are currently spending in comparison to your current income.  Calculate your current net worth (assets less liabilities).  Evaluate the state of your current financial situation.  What is keeps you up at night and what should be prioritized for immediate attention?

The next step is to devise a road map on where you would like to go.   Think about your values and set some long term strategic goals.  Using this information develop some financial goals that you would like to achieve.  Once you have identified some financial goals, a plan can be devised to help you achieve them.

Select the area you would like to address first.  Most of my clients start with retirement planning and investment management.  There is a lot of overlap between the different areas of financial planning but try to work through them in small manageable chunks.  Otherwise you may end up with a huge, overwhelming plan that never gets implemented.

Once you have worked through all of the areas in your financial plan you need to go back and revisit them on a regular basis.  Some areas like investments, taxes and retirement planning need to be reviewed annually where other areas like insurance and estate planning can be reviewed less frequently.  Keep in mind that financial planning is an on-going, life long process.

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