Value Provided by Financial Advisor Can Exceed Fee

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Many things can trigger the decision to hire a financial planner.  You may need some direction on how to prioritize your spending and saving to better prepare for the future.  You may be too busy or uninterested in managing your own finances.   You may experience a sudden life change such as a marriage, divorce, inheritance or retirement.   Your situation may be getting complicated and you want a professional opinion or you lack the technical expertise to continue managing things on your own.

Although, you may need a financial planner you may be hesitant to pay the fee.   Fee-only planners can be compensated using a flat fee, a percentage of assets or an hourly rate.   The fee will typically be around 1% of assets for on-ongoing advice.   A recent Vanguard study may help put your mind at ease.   The study found that the added value provided by a fee-only planner can far exceed the cost.

In 2014 Vanguard published the results of a study they conducted on the value added by advisors.  The study found that financial advisors can add up to about 3% in net returns for their clients by focusing on a wealth management framework they refer to as Advisor’s Alpha©.  The study found that an advisor can add to a client’s net returns if their approach includes the following five principles: being an effective behavioral coach, applying an asset location strategy, employing cost effective investments, maintaining the proper allocation through rebalancing and implementing a spending strategy.  These are just a few of the practices and principles followed by most comprehensive fee-only planners.

The exact amount of added return will vary based on client circumstances and implementation.  It should not be viewed as an annual return but as an average over time.  The opportunity for the greatest value comes during periods of extreme market duress or euphoria.  Additionally, Vanguard found that paying a fee for advice using this framework can add significant value in comparison to what the investor had previously experienced with or without an advisor.

Vanguard’s framework places emphasis on relationship oriented services that encourage discipline and reason, in working with clients who may otherwise be undisciplined and reactionary.  Rather than focusing on short term performance there is a focus on sticking to the plan and avoiding emotional overreaction. Advisors, acting as behavior coaches, can help discourage clients from chasing returns and focus instead on asset allocation, rebalancing, cash flow management and tax-efficient investment strategies.

The study found that when advisors place emphasis on stewardship and a strong relationship with the client, investors were less likely to make decisions that hurt their returns and negatively impacted their ability to reach long term financial goals.  According to Vanguard “Although this wealth creation will not show up on any client statement, it is real and represents the difference in clients’ performance if they stay invested according to their plan as opposed to abandoning it.”

Tips from the Wealthy on How to Get Rich

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

You don’t have to be incredibly intelligent and born into the Rockefeller family to attain wealth.   Below are some pointers commonly shared by wealthy people on how to manage your life and your money to reach financial independence.  There is no magic, achieving financial security involves straight forward, common sense actions to gradually build your net worth.

  1. Write Down Your Goals: It’s great to dream about what you want to achieve but to accomplish something you need to put your goals into writing and create an action plan to attain them.
  2. Control Your Expenses: Take the time to understand and manage your expenses and create a budget that supports your goals.   Spend less than you earn and develop good saving habits.  Keep your expenses in check when things are going well and avoid automatically increasing your expenses as your income grows.
  3. Don’t Buy Status: Don’t buy things to look rich or to impress your friends.  Most wealthy people drive older model used vehicles and live in modest homes.  Use your money to save for the future and spend on what really matters.
  4. Educate Yourself: Getting a good education and selecting the right career is a huge factor in attaining wealth.  A good education can result in a more rewarding job in a field you enjoy.  If you enjoy your work you are more likely to excel and earn more money.  If you are in a dead end job or a career you don’t enjoy consider going back to school to transition into a career for which you have more passion.
  5. Be Patient and Maintain a Long Term Perspective – The key to successful investing is having the patience to ride out fluctuations in the market. Resist the temptation to chase returns and time the market.  Invest for the long term and let your portfolio grow over time.  Stay the course and avoid making decisions triggered by emotions.
  6. Manage Risk and Return – Balance your desire for high return with the risk involved. Maintain a diversified portfolio with adequate short term liquidity to get you through rough spots in the market.   Rebalance on an annual basis to keep your portfolio diversified.  Take a disciplined approach to investing and avoid high risk investments that promise a return that may be too good to be true.
  7. Start your own business – According to Forbes nearly all of the people on their list of billionaires made their money through involvement with a business they or their family had started. Owning your own business may seem too risky but it can provide you with an opportunity for higher earnings and greater control over your financial future.
  8. Avoid Complex Investments – Avoid investing in anything that seems overly complicated or that you don’t fully understand. Complex investments often come with  greater risk, a lack of control, limited marketability, limited transparency and hidden fees.

Supercharge Your Career for Long Term Financial Security

office pictures may 2012 002Proactively managing your career is essential to your long term financial success.  While traditional financial planning is important, it’s crucial to invest in yourself and your career.  The return you can earn from a serious commitment to your career may be better than any investment return you may reasonably achieve.  Strategic attention to your career can result in increased long term income opportunities, a job you love, job security and resources to build your investment portfolio.

It’s too easy to become comfortable and complacent with your situation and settle for less compensation and job satisfaction than you deserve.   The first step toward supercharging your career is to understand yourself.  Evaluate what makes you happy and where your passions and talents lie. Consider how you can best utilize your skills, interests, and experience. Research potential opportunities in your current field as well as in new career fields.  Information about a variety of careers,and what they pay, is available in the Department of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook www.bls.gov.ooh.  Information on salaries can also be found on www.payscale.com and www.salary.com.

After doing your research and identifying some career opportunities, decide on your definition of career success and develop a plan to achieve this.   Career success is not based on luck but on strategic planning, action and commitment.  Establish some long and short term career goals to keep you on track toward meeting your plan.

To help achieve success, think of yourself as a brand of one.  In everything you do, consider your image and how people perceive you.  You have a reputation to build and maintain which should demonstrate trust, dependability, competency, enthusiasm and professionalism.  Don’t think of yourself as an employee but as a company of one who is working to bring success to your current firm.  This in turn will bring you success.  Be reliable and meet your commitments, proactively resolve problems and look for smarter ways to do business.  Do what is needed to get the job done, don’t lose site of the big picture, and focus on the bottom line.  Work strategically and watch for opportunities to meet the needs of your boss and your team.

Nurture relationships, be a team player, and keep a positive attitude.  Continually demonstrate how you can be of value to your boss, colleagues and clients.  Work in a collaborative manner and help others look good and get ahead.  Develop a strong personal network and find a mentor to assist you with your current job and exciting options for the future.

Proactively stay abreast of industry and technological changes. Seek out opportunities to learn and grow through continuing education and formal education.  You will experience more success if you embrace change and innovation.

Your career and ability to earn a good living can be your greatest financial asset – manage and nurture it to maximize your financial security.

What is Financial Planning?

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

I’m sure you hear the term “Financial Planning” on a regular basis but you may not be sure what it really means.  Financial planning is an on-going, comprehensive process to manage your finances in order to meet your life goals.  The process includes evaluating where you are today, setting goals, developing an action plan to meet your goals and implementing the plan.  Once you have addressed all the areas of your financial plan you should go back and review them on a regular basis.

Financial planning should be comprehensive – covering all areas of your financial life.  The primary areas of your financial plan should include retirement planning, insurance planning, tax planning, estate planning and investment management.    Depending on your situation, your financial plan may also address areas such as budgeting and debt management, college funding, employee benefits, business planning and career planning.  Comprehensive Financial Planning is very thorough and can take a lot of time and energy to complete.  I recommend breaking it into bite size chucks that can be easily evaluated, understood and implemented over the course of time.  

You can work through the financial planning process with a comprehensive financial planner or you can tackle it on your own.  If you decide to hire a financial planner, I encourage you to work with Certified Financial Planner who has taken an oath to work on a fiduciary basis.  An advisor, who works as a fiduciary, takes an oath to put your interests first.

The first step of the financial planning process is to evaluate where you are today.  Tabulate how much money you are currently spending in comparison to your current income.  Calculate your current net worth (assets less liabilities).  Evaluate the state of your current financial situation.  What is keeps you up at night and what should be prioritized for immediate attention?

The next step is to devise a road map on where you would like to go.   Think about your values and set some long term strategic goals.  Using this information develop some financial goals that you would like to achieve.  Once you have identified some financial goals, a plan can be devised to help you achieve them.

Select the area you would like to address first.  Most of my clients start with retirement planning and investment management.  There is a lot of overlap between the different areas of financial planning but try to work through them in small manageable chunks.  Otherwise you may end up with a huge, overwhelming plan that never gets implemented.

Once you have worked through all of the areas in your financial plan you need to go back and revisit them on a regular basis.  Some areas like investments, taxes and retirement planning need to be reviewed annually where other areas like insurance and estate planning can be reviewed less frequently.  Keep in mind that financial planning is an on-going, life long process.

Covering the High Cost of College Can Require Team Work, Diligence and Compromise

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

With soaring college expenses, few families can afford to cover the costs associated with putting their children through four years of college on top of daily living expenses and the need to save for retirement.   To avoid sacrificing your retirement savings and accruing large student loans, to finance your children’s college education, engage them in the process.  For most families, it is reasonable for the cost of college to be a shared responsibility between you and your children.

Start early by encouraging your children to get good grades, to participate in extracurricular activities, and to volunteer in the community.   While in high school, encourage your child to enroll in Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses that provide high school and college credit.  Your child could have several college courses completed before graduating from high school.  This could save you thousands of dollars. 

Explore all forms of financial aid even if you think you may not be eligible.  You may be surprised, especially if you have several children attending college at once.  Additionally, do your research and be open-minded with regard to the colleges you consider.  Some schools that seem too expensive may have excellent financial aid packages for your situation.

If you find yourself in the common place where you earn too much for financial aid, but not enough to pay the full ride of four year college education, research the availability of merit scholarships.   While your child is still in high school, thoroughly research the availability of scholarships.  Talk to the high school guidance counselor and check with community organizations.  Once in college your child should talk to the financial aid officer, department heads and professors for potential scholarship opportunities.  Also check on-line resources including CollegeBoard.com, CollegeNet.com, and Fastweb.com.  Every year many scholarships go unused because qualified candidates don’t apply.  

Your child can dramatically decrease the cost of tuition by attending a community college for the first two years and then transferring to a four year university.  Many universities have arrangements with local community colleges to transfer credits earned toward the first two years of a bachelor’s degree.    The cost of tuition at a community college is usually less than one half of that at a four year university. 

Another way to reap tremendous savings is for the student to live at home and attend a local school.  In 2014 the cost of tuition and fees at the University of Colorado is about $12,600 and the cost of room and board is about $13,000. 

If after exploring the options above, the cost of college is still beyond your reach; your student may need to work while attending college.  To help pay for tuition, your student may need to work 30 hours a week and take a lighter class load.  Graduating in five years may be better than incurring huge student loans.

Embracing the Future on Your Own

 

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Losing a spouse completely changes your life, and it’s important to take the time you need to grieve and heal.  The sadness may never go away and you’ll always miss your husband, but after two or three years you may be ready to look toward the future.  Before the loss of your husband, the two of you made plans; these plans may no longer be the best course of action for you.  It is common to feel an obligation to follow the plans you developed together, that you would somehow betray your husband’s memory to follow a different course.   Nothing could be further from the truth.  Your situation has completely changed and you may have a whole new perspective on things.   Plans that worked for the two of you, together, may no longer be practical for you.  Without even realizing it, you may have been striving to fulfill your husband’s dream rather than your own.   It’s time to follow your own path and build a future that supports your new hopes and dreams.  This article makes reference to widows but it can also be helpful to widowers.

Start by reflecting on your personal values; think about what and who is important to you and what you enjoy doing.  What type of lifestyle do you want to lead and where do you want to live.   Take out a piece more info

of paper and fill it with goals and ideas on things you would like to accomplish.  Let your mind wander, don’t evaluate, just brainstorm ideas.  Now go back and contemplate this list and formulate about five to ten realistic goals to be achieved in the next year or so.  Prioritize these goals and identify some action steps to be taken.

Now it’s time to review your financial situation with respect to your goals.  Many of your goals may be financially oriented.  Start reviewing your current cash flow, identify and tabulate your expenses, and compare them to your income.  Are your expenses in line with your goals, or do you need to change the way you spend money.   At the very least, make sure your expenses don’t exceed your income and put aside an emergency fund equal to at least three months of expenses.  I also encourage you to save at least 10% of your annual gross income.

Once your current financial situation is secure, develop a financial plan for the future.  Are there any major changes needed to achieve your long term goals?  Do you want to live in a different city or do you want to sell your home and buy something with less maintenance?  Do you need to rearrange your spending habits or make some changes in your career?  As you plan for the future, make sure you are saving and investing enough to cover retirement expenses.  Be sure to incorporate some fun and adventure into your plans!

Tips to Acheive Financial Fitness

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA


The first step toward financial fitness is to understand your current situation and live within your means. Review your actual expenses on an annual basis and categorize your expenses as necessary or discretionary. Compare your expenses to your income and develop a budget to ensure you are living within your means and saving for the future. The next step is to pay off high interest credit cards and personal debts. Once you have paid off your credit cards, create and maintain an emergency fund equal to about four months of expenses, including expenses for the current month. Your emergency funds should be readily accessible in a checking, savings or money market account.
Now it’s time to look toward the future. Get in the habit of always saving at least 10% to 15% of your gross income. Think about your goals and what you want to accomplish. If you don’t own a home, you may want to save for a down payment. When you purchase a home make sure you can easily make the payments while contributing toward retirement. Generally, your mortgage expense should be at or below 25% of your take home pay.
Contribute money into retirement plans, for which you qualify. Make contributions to your 401k plan, at least up to the employer match and maximize your Roth IRA. If you are self-employed, consider a SEP or a Simple plan. If you have children and want to contribute to their college expenses, consider a 529 college savings plan. Do not contribute so much toward your children’s college fund that you sacrifice your own retirement.
As you save for retirement, be an investor not a trader. Investing in the stock market is a long term endeavor, forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market is fruitless. Avoid emotional reactions to headlines and short term events. Don’t overreact to sensationalistic stories or chase the latest investment trends. Establish a defensive position by maintaining a well-diversified portfolio, custom designed for your unique situation. Slow and steady wins the race!
Don’t invest in anything that you don’t understand or that sounds too good to be true. If you really want to invest in complicated products, read the fine print. Be especially aware of high commissions, fees, and surrender charges. There is no free lunch; if you are being offered above market returns, there is probably a catch. Keep in mind that contracts are written to protect the insurance or investment company, not the investor.
It is impossible to predict fluctuations in the market or to select the next great stock. However, you can hedge your bets with a well-diversified portfolio. Establish an asset allocation that is aligned with your goals, investment timeframe, and risk tolerance. Your portfolio should contain a mix of fixed income and stock based investments across a wide variety of companies and industries. Rebalance your portfolio on an annual basis to stay diversified.

Financial Guidance for Widows in Transition

 
A workshop from the heart for women who are widowed

or anticipate becoming a widow in the future . . .

or those with a widowed friend or family member

 Friday, August 3, 2012 from 9:30am – 11:30am 

at Bethany Lutheran Church

4500 E. Hampton Avenue

Cherry Hills Village, 80113

OR 

  Friday, August 3, 2012 from 2:00 – 4:00 PM
 
at First Lutheran Church

1515 N. Cascade Avenue

Colorado Springs, 80907

 There is no charge to attendees, but advance registration is required.
Call 1-800-579-9496 or email Bob.kuehner@lfsrm.org

 Join us for a special presentation by Kathleen M. Rehl, Ph.D., CFP®, award winning author and speaker. She presents practical information in an engaging and entertaining manner, along with issues of the heart. The workshop is open to all . . . although it’s especially designed for women. So, bring your gal friends for an enjoyable morning out together.

   Kathleen’s world changed forever when her husband died. From personal grief experiences, her life purpose evolved-helping widows to feel more secure, enlightened and empowered about their financial matters. She is passionate about assisting her “widowed sisters” take control of their financial future.

 Dr. Rehl is a leading authority on the subject of widows and their financial issues. She is frequently invited to give presentations across the country on this topic.

 She and her book, Moving Forward on Your Own: A Financial Guidebook for Widows, have been featured in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Kiplinger’s, AARP Bulletin, U.S. News & World Report, Consumer Reports, Investment News, Bottom Line and many others. The guidebook has received 10 national and international awards.

 To devote more time to writing and speaking, Kathleen closed her practice to new clients some time ago. She was previously named as one of the country’s 100 Great Financial Planners by Mutual Funds Magazine.

 Please be our guest for this educational and enlightening workshop!

 This event is a sponsored gift to the community from
 Jane M. Young, CFP with Pinnacle Financial Concepts, Inc.
   

 (719)260-9800

www.MoneyWiseWidow.com

 
   
 

10 Financial Planning Tips to Start 2012

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

1. Dream – Take a few minutes to look at the big picture and think about what you want from life. How do you want to live, what do you want to do and how do you want to spend your time. Successful businesses have vision statements and strategic plans. Create your own personal vision statement and strategic plan.

2. Set Goals – What are your goals for the coming year? Start by brainstorming – fill a page by listing all the goals that come to mind. Think about different facets of your life such as family, career, education, finance, health and so forth. Review your list and prioritize three or four goals to focus on in the coming year.

3. Evaluate Your Current Situation – What did you spend and what did you earn last year? What was necessary and what was discretionary? Did you spend in a purposeful manner and do your expenses support your goals and strategic plan. How much did you save or invest in a retirement plan? Can you increase this in 2012? If you are like most of us, a category is needed for “I have no clue”.

4. Track Spending and Address Problem Areas – If you aren’t sure where you spent all that discretionary cash, track your expenses for a month or two. It can be very enlightening – Yikes! Identify a few problem areas where you can cut spending and really place some focus. Identify the actions you will take to cut spending in these areas. Set weekly limits and come up with creative alternatives to save you money.

5. Evaluate Your Career – Are you doing what you really want? Are you being paid what you are worth? Have you become too comfortable that you are settling for safe and familiar? Could you earn more or work in a more rewarding position if you took the time to look? Are you current in your field or do you need to take some refresher courses? Do you know what it will take to get a promotion or a better job? In this volatile job market you need to keep your skills current, to nurture your network and to maintain a current resume.

6. Maintain an Emergency Fund – Start or maintain an emergency fund equal to at least four months of expenses, including the current month. This should be completely liquid in a checking, savings or money market account.

7. Pay Off Debt – Establish a plan to pay off all of your credit card debt. Once this is paid off establish a plan to start paying off personal debt and student loans.

8. Save 10-15% of your income (take advantage of employee Benefits) – You need to save at least 10-15% of your income to provide a buffer against tough financial times and to invest for retirement. At a very minimum, you need to contribute up to the amount your employer will match. Additionally, be sure to take advantage of flex benefits or employee stock purchase plans that may be offered by your employer.

9. Maintain a Well Diversified Portfolio – Maintain a well-diversified portfolio that provides you with the best return for your risk tolerance, your investment goals and your investment time horizon. Be sure to re-balance your portfolio on an annual basis. Avoid over reacting to short term swings in the market with money that is invested for the long term.

10. Don’t Pay Too Much Income Tax – Avoid paying too much income tax. Get organized and keep good records to be sure you are maximizing your deductions. Make tax wise investment decisions, harvest tax losses and maximize the use of tax deferred investment vehicles. Donate unwanted items to charity – be sure to document your donations with a receipt.

“What is Modern Retirement and Will You be Ready?” Join us on September 7th for our next Pinnacle Fireside Chat.

Please mark your calendars for our next Pinnacle Financial “Fireside Chat”, to be held on Wednesday, September 7th from 7:30am – 9:00am.

Jane will discuss the characteristics of modern retirement and how to plan for it. She will explore different approaches to retirement and some of the factors to be considered. She will also explain the various plans available to help you save for retirement.

The Fireside Chat sessions are informational only (no sales!) and interactive — a great opportunity to learn new things and ask questions in a relaxed environment. These sessions are open to your family and friends, so please feel free to pass this email along to anyone that you think might be interested in attending.

Please call Judy (719-260-9800) if you would like to attend this session on September 7th, as space is limited.

We hope to see you on September 7th! Coffee and donuts will be served!

10 Tips for Financial Success

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Jane M. Young CFP, EA

1. Set Goals –
Review your personal values, develop a personal strategic plan, establish specific goals for the next three years and identify action steps for the coming year.

2. Understand Your Current Situation –
Review your actual expenses over the last year and develop a budget or a cash flow plan for the next 12 months. Compare your expenses and your income to better understand your cash flow situation. Are you’re spending habits aligned with your goals? Can or should you be saving more?

3. Have sufficient Liquidity –
Maintain an emergency fund equal to at least four months of expenses in a fully liquid account. Additionally, I recommend having a secondary emergency fund equal to another three months of expenses in semi-liquid investments. Increase your liquidity if you have above average volatility in your life due to job instability, rental properties or other risk factors.

4. Always save at least 10% of your income –
Regardless of whether you are saving to fund your emergency fund or retirement you should always pay yourself first by saving at least 10% of your income. Most of us need to be saving closer to 15% to meet our retirement needs.

5. Pay-off Credit Cards and Consumer Debt –
Learn the difference between bad debt (credit cards) and good debt (fixed-rate home mortgage). Avoid the bad debt and take advantage of the leveraging power of good debt.

6. Take Advantage of the Leveraging Power of Owning Your Home –
Once you have established an emergency fund and have paid off your bad debt start saving for a down payment to purchase your own home.

7. Fully Fund Your Retirement Accounts be a tax smart investor –
Participate in tax advantaged retirement programs for which you qualify. Maximize your Roth IRA and 401k contribution take full advantage of any company match on your 401k. If you are self-employed consider a SEP or Simple plan. Always select investment vehicles that provide the most beneficial tax solution while meeting your investment objectives.

8. Be an Investor, Not a Trader. Don’t time the market and don’t let emotions drive your investment decisions –
Investing in the stock market is a long term endeavor, forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market is fruitless. Avoid emotional reactions to headlines and short-term events. Don’t overreact to sensationalistic journalists or chase the latest investment trends. You can establish a defensive position by maintaining a well diversified portfolio custom tailored to your unique situation. Slow and steady wins the race!
“Far more money has been lost by investors in preparing for corrections, or anticipating corrections, than has been lost in the corrections themselves.”  -Peter Lynch, author and former mutual fund manager with Fidelity Investments

9. Don’t Invest in anything you don’t understand and be aware of high fees and penalties –
If it sounds too good to be true and you just can’t get your head around it, don’t invest in it! If you want to invest in complicated products, read the fine print. Be aware of commissions, fees and surrender charges. Be especially wary of products with a contingent deferred sales charge. There is no free lunch, if you are being promised above market returns there is probably a catch. Keep in mind that contracts are written to protect the insurance or investment company not the investor.

10. Diversify, Diversify, Diversify – rebalance annually –
It is impossible to predict fluctuations in the market or to select the next great stock. However, you can hedge your bets by maintaining a well diversified portfolio. Establish an asset allocation that is aligned with your goals, investment timeframe and risk tolerance. You should have a good mix of fixed income and equity based investments. Your equity investments should be spread over a wide variety of large, small, domestic and international companies and industries. Re-balance your portfolio on an annual basis to stay diversified and weed out any underperforming investments.

A Money Moment with Jane – What Are You Spending Today?

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By Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

The first step to any solid financial plan is understanding your current situation. How much money is remaining after paying your non-discretionary expenses? If you don’t know, then you need to review your expenses over the last few months to better understand your spending habits. How much do you spend on non-discretionary items and how much do you spend on discretionary items. Are you happy with how you are spending your money? Are you saving as much as you could? Are you spending too much on frivolous items? Do your spending habits align with your goals? Have you set some financial goals?

Your Money Bus is Coming to Colorado Springs

Your Money Bus is coming to Colorado Springs.

                               Get free professional advice, no strings attached

It’s never too late to secure your financial future.

Re: Free Non-profit Financial Education Event – Please share with friends, family and business associates.

All of us have family; friends and colleagues who are struggling to save money, eliminate debt and find jobs. Please share with them the opportunity to meet for a free one-on-one with local independent financial advisors when the national Your Money Bus Tour rolls into Colorado Springs on July 8th and 9th. Pinnacle Financial Concepts, Inc. is coordinating the Colorado Springs stop of this non-profit tour, visiting more that 25 cities. We will be volunteering at this event along with several other fee-only financial planning firms in town. The Your Money Bus Tour is sponsored by The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) Consumer Education Foundation, TD AMERITRADE, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine and FiLife.com.

The Your Money Bus Tour will stop in Colorado Springs at the Penrose Library (downtown) on July 8th from 12:00 – 7:00 and at UCCS, Lot 1 on July 9th from 12:00 – 5:00. At each stop, consumers can sit down with locally-based volunteer financial advisors to ask pressing financial questions. All Money Bus visitors will receive a free financial education kit, including a Kiplinger magazine and a budgetary workbook.

Forty percent of American families spend more than they earn and the average American with a credit file has more than $16,000 in debt, not including mortgages. We encourage people to stop byYour Money Bus to learn how to better save, eliminate debt and develop personal financial sustainability habits that will get them through and beyond these tough times.

The NAPFA Consumer Education Foundation is a 501c (3) organization committed to educating Americans on personal finance. Consumers need easy to understand information without any bias, sales, or conflicts of interest. All volunteer financial advisors are fee-only fiduciaries; nothing is being sold or promoted. This is strictly educational and free information for the public. The public is welcome to just stop by or make an appointment ahead of time.

For more information, visit www.YourMoneyBus.com and for up-to-date schedule information contact Krist Allnutt,krista.allnutt@perceptiononline.com.

Warmest Regards,

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

My New Year’s Resolution Challenge to You!

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

I am a huge fan of short and long term goal setting and the use of to-do lists. We can be much more productive if we organize our objectives and our time. I wouldn’t set out on a major vacation without an itinerary nor would I try to cook a complicated dish without a recipe. Without goals or to-do lists we are too easily distracted. We waste a lot of time and end up going down the wrong path.

I encourage everyone to start with a list of about 20-30 long term goals. From this list identify about 10 things you would like to achieve this year. Then develop a to-do list of things you need to accomplish this week or month. You are way ahead of the game just by writing down some goals and priorities. This forces you to think about your values, desires and objectives for the year. This will serve as your personal strategic plan to make sure you are on the right track.

I know everyone comes up with a list of New Year’s resolutions and we seldom stick to them. So why bother? I think the process itself is good because you have given some thought to what you want to accomplish. You may not reach all of your goals but some of your effort will come to fruition.

I have a special challenge for you in 2010. Think about all the things you would like to accomplish or change in 2010. Select just ONE thing that you must accomplish or change this year and write it down. Make a vow to yourself to do whatever it takes to accomplish this one goal. Create an action plan to reach your objective. Share your goal with at least one other person who will hold you accountable. Be sure to monitor and reward your progress.

If you want to share, I would love to hear about your “One Goal” for 2010 and how you are progressing.

10 Great Money Saving Ideas for the Holidays

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

1. Make a plan – who will receive a gift and how much do you plan to spend. Stick to your plan, keep track of your spending, and don’t spend on impulse.

2. Start early and give yourself plenty of time to select gifts and compare prices. We always over buy and spend too much when pressed for time.

3. Find creative ways to reduce the number of people for whom you plan to give gifts. Instead of buying gifts for friends make arrangements to make each other dinner or meet for an inexpensive happy hour. Remember that receiving a gift can be stressful and a nice a card or gesture may be more appropriate

4. Suggest that your family or group of friends draw names instead of buying gifts for everyone. It is difficult and expensive to buy gifts for a large number of people who already have everything.

5. Exchange white elephant gifts or favorite used books instead of expensive Christmas gifts. This is especially fun in conjunction with a Chinese gift exchange where everyone gets a chance to steal a gift from the other participants.

6. Gift a homemade present such as a homemade sauce, stew or soup, a painting, a knitted scarf, cookies, or a pie. You can capture a special moment by framing a photo or post card or you can create a calendar with some sentimental photographs.

7. If you have more time than money gift your services such as babysitting, home maintenance, faux painting, cooking a meal, house cleaning, shoveling snow, decorating advice, cooking lessons, a musical performance, or computer instruction.

8. Rather than providing all the food for your holiday party, ask your friends to bring a dish and a bottle of wine. Co-host a party with a few friends and share the cost. If you are planning a neighborhood party, consider a progressive party where each course is served at a different home.

9. Avoid purchasing expensive new holiday clothes. Make your existing wardrobe more festive through the use of inexpensive accessories and scarves. If you really need a new outfit check out your local consignment stores. Holiday and formal attire isn’t worn very often and is usually in good shape at consignment stores.

10. Lower the cost of Christmas cards and postage by using post cards, e-cards, e-mail or a simple phone call. It’s the thought that counts.

Ten Things You Can Do Now To Save Taxes in 2009

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Whew!! The 2008 tax season is finally over and we can relax. Well not exactly; this is a great time to prepare for 2009 taxes. A little effort now can help you save in 2009 and will make the process a whole lot smoother. Below are some ideas to help save taxes in 2009.

1. Create a folder for your 2009 tax documents and receipts. Create a file right now, and keep it somewhere convenient, to keep track of all those expenses and donations as they occur.

2. Start going through your old clothes and junk in the garage and donate it to a charity of your choice, if you itemize this can provide a sizable deduction. Remember, keep a log of everything you donate and get a receipt!

3. If you anticipate a substantial change in your 2009 income or if you owed a lot in 2008, now is the time to adjust your withholdings or your estimated payments. There is nothing worse than owing an unexpected $5000 at the end of the year.

4. Maximize your contribution to tax deferred retirement plans. Limits on the 401k, Simple and SEP have all increased this year. If you turned 50 this year you can now make catch-up contributions to your retirement plans including your IRA (assuming you are otherwise qualified).

5. Do you anticipate a decrease in income this year? You may be eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA or for a conversion from a Roth IRA to a traditional IRA. The recent drop in the stock market has made conversion to a Roth IRA very appealing. You can pay income taxes on your account now, while the balance is low. Then during retirement, when the market has recovered, you can take tax free withdrawals. In 2009 your AGI must be less than $100,000 to be eligible for a conversion.

6. Will you be paying college expenses sometime soon? If you live in Colorado you can invest the money you will be spending on college expenses in a 529 plan and deduct the contribution from your state income tax. If you have a couple kids in college this can be significant. Don’t worry; you can invest the money in something very safe within the 529 if you are worried about market volatility.

7. If you are a first time homeowner you may be eligible for a 10% credit up to $8000 if you buy a home by December 1, 2009. This is really more like an interest free loan because it must be paid back over 15 years. Additionally, it is subject to income limits. The credit begins to phase-out for joint filers with modified adjusted gross income of $150,000 or more.

8. Are you thinking about buying a new car? You may be able to deduct the sales and local tax if you buy the car this year. This is subject to an income phase out if your adjusted gross income exceeds $125,000. I know they take all the good stuff away from middle class wage earners.

9. If you own a business or work as a consultant, be sure to keep accurate and complete records. Don’t forget to track your mileage, the current deduction for business mileage is $.55 per mile. This is frequently overlooked or understated due to poor record keeping. Additionally, if you work in your home and have a dedicated work area you may want to claim a home office deduction.

10. Take advantage of the drop in the stock market to do some tax harvesting. Tax harvesting is taking advantage of a market decline to sell some of the dogs in your investment portfolio while taking a capital loss or reduced capital gain. Prior to the market drop, the sale of a particular security may have been prohibitive due to capital gains. Now you can take advantage of the drop in the market to clean up your portfolio or do some re-balancing of your asset allocation.

10 Ways to Save Money on Food

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

1. When grocery shopping, select items from the lower shelves, the more expensive items are usually placed at eye level.

2. Stock up when durable goods that you always need go on sale. Don’t buy something you wouldn’t otherwise buy just because it’s on sale.

3. Reduce impulse purchases at the grocery store – go less frequently, make a list and eat before you go. I know, I know, those strawberry shortcake cookies, with the cream filling and chocolate swirls looked so good. But a few days later …… what was I thinking??

4. When comparing prices check the unit price not the total price. You may pay less but you are probably getting less for your money.

5. Eat smaller portions of meat – you might even lose a little weight. Meat is very expensive, use more vegetables and less meat in you recipes.

6. When eating out, eat half of your meal at the restaurant and take the rest home with you. Most restaurants serve very large portions.

7. When eating out limit yourself to one glass of wine or drink tap water instead of coffee, tea or soda. Beverages can be very expensive relative to the cost your food.

8. If you are having an entrée avoid ordering appetizers or desert at the restaurant. Have drinks and appetizers at home before you leave or coffee and desert at home after dinner.

9. Eat something at home before you go out to meet friends. Limit your order to an appetizer or a side salad to be sociable.

10. Rather than celebrating at a restaurant, organize a potluck or take turns hosting a dinner party.

Painless Money Saving Ideas

I am starting a new on-going feature that will provide money saving ideas.   My goal is to contribute something on saving money about once a month. In the current economy we need all the help we can get. If you have any money saving ideas please send them to me and I’ll include them in the blog. I’ll start with a few ideas that have worked for me.

• Start shopping for clothing at consignment stores. I love good quality clothing but hate to pay the price. For years I’ve been meaning to stop by this cute little boutique on the west side of town and I finally did. Three hours later and two hundred dollars poorer, I walked out with what would have cost me at least $1000 in a regular retail store.

• Save your change. Do you have loose change all over your house and car? I started putting all my loose change in a jar and I had over a hundred dollars saved up in no time!

• Identify and focus on one or two problem areas. We all have areas in our lives where we spend too much. Mine is spending too much eating out. I am trying to focus on this area by keeping groceries in the house, taking breakfast and lunch to work, going to restaurants when they have special deals, sharing a meal and going to a nice restaurant and eating at the bar (same chef ).

• Lengthen the time between personal care appointments such as hair-cuts and manicures. I used to get my hair cut every 4-5 weeks. I found I could go about 6-8 weeks without any problem. Do some of your own personal care and limit that professional manicure or pedicure to once a month or to special occasions.

• Take the time to really shop around for airline tickets. We recently saved $400 per ticket by shopping around and checking numerous different possibilities. Take advantage of opportunities to get airline miles on your credit card. I have two cards that give me airline miles and I make a point to put all of my large purchases on a credit card to get the mileage credit.