A Money Moment with Jane – A Few Financial Planning Suggestions for the Fall

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By Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

  • Required Minimum Distributions were not required for 2009.  However, if you are at least 70½ you will be required to take a distribution in 2010.

 

  • If you are planning to convert some of your regular IRA to a Roth IRA, do so in 2010 to spread the taxes over 2011 and 2112.

 

  • Have you maximized your Roth IRA and 401k contribution?  The 2010 contribution limit for the Roth is $5,000 plus a $1,000 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.  The 2010 contribution limit for 401k plans is $16,500 plus a $5,500 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.

 

  • This is a good time to do some tax planning to make sure your withholdings or estimates are adequate to cover the taxes you will owe in April. 

 

  • Do you have any underperforming stocks or mutual funds that should be sold to take advantage of a tax loss in 2010?

 

  • Now is the time to go through your home for items to be donated to charity.  These can provide a nice deduction on your 2010 tax return.

 

  • Start planning for Christmas now and save money by working to a plan. 

 

Are You Paying Too Much for Financial Planning and Advice? by Jane Bryant Quinn

Here is a great piece by Jane Bryant Quinn.
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Are You Paying Too Much for Financial Planning and Advice?
By Jane Bryant Quinn | Sep 21, 2010 | 5 Comments

How much are you paying for the financial-planning advice you get? Some investors don’t know. Others think they know but don’t. “Fee-only” planners and registered investment advisors state their fees up front. “Fee-based” advisors appear to do the same but might be charging you in other ways. Brokerage house advisory accounts charge the most and can entangle you in costs you didn’t expect.

In short, a stated fee isn’t always what it seems. For that matter, neither is an advisor. I recommend fee-only planners but I’ve found some who are so new to the business or so limited in their skills that I wouldn’t go near them.

So how do you go about assessing what you’re paying for advice and what the potential conflicts or trouble spots might be? Here’s a rundown:

Fee-only advice. This is my choice, always. These advisors give you a price list up front, for work by the hour, by the task, or for ongoing management of your money. They don’t take sales commissions, so they’re not primed to push products. They sell only their planning and investment expertise.

Within this world, however, there’s a lot of variation.

A fee-only planner, with a CFP designation (for Certified Financial Planner) helps you establish your priorities and goals, create budgets, set savings targets, test your insurance safety net, establish retirement savings accounts, project future retirement income, plan for taxes, and make basic investment decisions. By “basic,” I mean simple asset allocation and picking no-load (no sales charge) mutual funds. That’s all that most families need. You can find some of these fee-only planners through the Garrett Planning Network, the Alliance of Cambridge Advisors, or the Financial Planning Association (when you search the FPA site, click on “How Planners Charge” and check the box for “fee-only”).

But some of these advisors — especially people who have been in business for only three or four years — might not have the knowledge or experience to analyze your investments in depth. Those with a brokerage-house background are familiar with securities, but others are still learning. They might be qualified to advise on mutual funds but not individual stocks and bonds. They might be taking clients before they’ve finished their CFP.

On average, you’ll find more experienced planners through the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors. Some NAPFA members deal only with people of higher wealth. Others take middle-class clients, too (see what their websites say).

Even planners with good paper qualifications might not serve you well if they don’t understand your life experience. For example, young planners who don’t own homes are not the best guide through mortgage decisions. Someone in his or her mid-30s will think more aggressively about investments than someone in late middle age. If you’re approaching retirement, you want a planner who can feel the same, cold wind of uncertainty that you do.

Fee-only planners typically charge 1 percent on accounts up to $1 million or so, and less on larger amounts. But fees have been going up, says Tom Orecchio of Modera Wealth Management and former president of NAPFA. Some firms charge 1.5 percent or more for the first $500,000.

“Advisors say they’re working harder, for less money, than at any time in their career,” Orecchio says. Accounts under management have declined in value, clients need more handholding, and more new products are coming to market that need evaluating. So they’re charging people more.

Normally, a percentage fee applies only to money that the planner has directly under management. A few planners assess the fee on your total net worth, including your 401(k) and home equity. “That’s for comprehensive financial planning,” says John Sestina of John E. Sestina and Co. “We advise on everything, including whether to refinance a mortgage and how to allocate a 401(k).” He charges $5,000 for accounts up to $1 million (that’s 0.05 percent, at the top) and larger fees for larger accounts. For younger clients, he offers “financial planning lite”– $1,000 for full planning and investment services on accounts of any size, but only two or three meetings a year.

Fee-based advice. Here, you have wolves in sheep’s clothing. It sounds as if they also give fee-only advice. In fact, they sell products and earn commissions. You might pay fees for some products and commissions for others. The size of the fees might depend on what else you buy. “Fee offset” means that the fee is deducted from the commission you pay. Commissions aren’t always visible, so it’s easy to pay more than you realize.

Brokerage house advisory accounts. You pay fees here, too. The broker provides an investment plan, developed and monitored by the firm’s advisory team. You get periodic reports. Small investors, with $25,000 to $50,000, might be charged in the area of 2 percent a year. These accounts don’t include packaged products such as variable annuities or unit trusts. Your broker might sell them to you on the side, earning a commission on the trade.

Skip these expensive advisory accounts if you’re a long-term investor who holds mutual funds and a few stocks. You’re much better off in a regular brokerage account that doesn’t charge fees–or, for that matter, with a fee-only planner.

Regarding conflicts of interest, I’m always careful about the commissioned-sales world because of its fondness for selling high-cost products. But the fee-only world has potential conflicts, too. Planners who charge on an hourly basis might stretch out the time it takes to complete your job. Planners who work on retainer might pay less attention to your account, because they’ve got the money anyway. Planners who charge a percentage of assets have an incentive to hold on to your money — for example, by recommending that you keep your mortgage rather than paying it off.

Always evaluate the advice, in terms of your advisor’s interest as well as your own. Advice isn’t always worth what you pay for it. You might do better by paying less.

Take Control of Your Life with a Personal Strategic Plan

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Jane M. Young, CFP,EA

At least once a year we need to step back from our daily routine to look at our lives from a broader perspective. We get so bogged down with daily responsibilities we lose track of where we are, and where we want to go. Take the time to do some personal strategic planning. Start by looking at what you are actually spending and saving. How much do you spend in a typical month, how much is necessary spending and how much is discretionary? How do your expenses compare to your income? How do your expenses and your savings line up with your goals?

Maybe you haven’t thought about your long range goals for awhile. I challenge you to make a list of 30–50 goals that you would like to accomplish over the next five years. I know… that’s a lot! Think of this as a brainstorming exercise. Don’t evaluate the importance of a goal, just write down what comes to mind. If you are having difficulty thinking of 30–50 goals, try thinking of goals in the following categories: friends and family, health, career, social and entertainment, money and finance, spiritual, education, and community. Once you have created your list, prioritize your goals by importance and timeframe. Develop an action plan for your high priority goals.

Now go back and review your expenses. Are your spending and saving habits congruent with your long term goals? Use the information you have pulled together to develop a spending and savings plan that supports your personal strategic plan. Once you have a clear picture of where you are and where you want to go, you can take control of your life.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt

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