Volatile Market Good Time for Retirement Savings

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

This is a great time to maximize your retirement contributions.  Not only will you save money on taxes but you can buy stock mutual funds on sale.  The one year return on the S&P 500 is down about 8% and market volatility is likely to continue throughout the year.

Dollar cost averaging is a great way to invest during a volatile market and it is well suited for contributing to your retirement plans.  With dollar cost averaging you invest a set amount every month or quarter up to your annual contribution limit.  When the stock market is low you buy more shares and when the market is high you buy fewer shares.  You can take advantage of dips in the market and avoid buying too much at, inopportune times when the market is high.

Ideally, the goal is to maximize contributions to your tax advantaged retirement plans however, this isn’t always possible.  Prioritize by contributing to your employer’s 401k plan up to the match, if your employer matches your contributions.   Your next priority is usually to maximize contributions to your Roth and then resume contributions to your 401k, 403b, 457 or self-employment plan.   Contributions to traditional employer plans are made with before tax dollars and taxable at regular income tax rates when withdrawn.  Roth contributions are made with after tax dollars and are tax free when withdrawn in retirement.   Some employers have begun to offer a Roth option with their 401k or 403b plans.

For 2015 and 2016 the maximum you can contribute to an IRA is $5,500 plus a catch-up provision of $1,000, if you were 50 or older by the last day of the year.  You have until the due date of your return, not including extensions, to make a contribution – which is April 18 for 2015. There are income limits on who can contribute to a Roth IRA.  In 2015, eligibility to contribute to a Roth IRA phases out at a Modified Adjusted Income (MAGI) of $116,000 to $131,000 for single filers and $183,000 to $193,000 for joint filers.  In 2016 the phase out is $117,000 to $132,000 for single filers and $184,000 to $194,000 for joint filers.

Your 401k contribution limits for both 2015 and 2016 are $18,000 plus a catch-up provision of $6,000, if you were 50 or over by the end of the year.  If you are employed by a non-profit organization, contact your benefits office for contribution limits on your plan.

If you are self-employed maximize your Simple (Savings Investment Match Plan for Employees) or SEP (Simplified Employee Pension Plan) and if you don’t already have a plan consider starting one to help defer taxes until retirement.

Regardless of your situation take advantage of retirement plans to defer or reduce income taxes on your retirement savings.  Current market volatility may provide some good opportunities to help boost your retirement nest egg.

Investing in a Volatile Market

 

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Here are some things you should keep in mind when investing in the stock market; the market will fluctuate, there will be years with negative returns, the stock market is for long term investing, and the media and prognosticators will greatly exaggerate negative information to create news and get attention.  If you keep this in mind, you can dramatically improve your long term investment returns and sleep better at night.  Based on numerous studies conducted by DALBAR, the average investor earns several percentage points below the market average due to market timing and emotional reactions to market fluctuations.  It’s how we are wired.  When the market goes up, we feel good and we want don’t want to miss out on the opportunity to make money.  As a result, we buy stock when the market is at its peak.  On the flip side, when the market drops we worry about losing money, and sell when the market is at the bottom.  It’s hard to make money in this cycle of buying high and selling low.  When investing in the stock market, try to avoid overreacting to the inevitable short term fluctuations in the market.

Other factors that can help you ride out dramatic fluctuations in the market include establishing a solid financial foundation and maintaining an asset allocation that meets your investment timeframe.  Establish a solid financial foundation by living within your means, minimizing the use of credit, and maintaining an emergency fund of 3 to 6 months of expenses.  A strong foundation helps you avoid pulling money out of the stock market at inopportune times should an emergency arise. 

Once you have established a strong financial foundation you can start investing in the stock market.  One key to success with stock market investing is establishing an asset allocation that’s in line with the timeframe in which you will need money.  Money that is needed in the short term should not be invested it the stock market.  As a general rule, do not invest any money needed within the next five years in the stock market.  Over long periods of time the stock market has trended upward, but in the short term there have been periods with substantial drops.  Give yourself time to ride out the natural fluctuations in the market.  

Additionally, it is important to diversify your money across a wide variety of investments.  You can reduce the amount of risk you take by diversifying across different companies, municipalities, industries, and countries.  When one type of investment is doing poorly, another may be doing well.  This helps to buffer the losses you may experience in your portfolio.  An excellent way to diversify is through the use of a variety of different types of mutual funds.  Mutual funds pool your money with money from others to invest in a large number of companies or government entities based on a predefined investment objective.

Selling Home May be Better Option Than Renting

 

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Jane M. Young CFP, EA

 

It’s time to move but you hate to sell your house when the market is down.  Maybe you should rent your house for a few years? Or, on second thought, maybe not.

There are many factors to consider before deciding to rent your home.  Do you have the temperament and the time to be a landlord?  Are you comfortable with the idea of having someone else living in your home?  Do you want to manage the rental yourself or do you plan to hire a property manager?  If you manage the property yourself do you have time to learn about fair housing laws, code requirements, lease agreements, escrow requirements and eviction procedures?  Who will take care of repairs and maintenance and are you ready for tenant calls in the middle of the night?  If this sounds a bit daunting, a property manager may be your best option.  A property manager will cost you about 10% of the rent.  Be sure to include this in your cash flow analysis.

Before renting your home do a realistic cash flow analysis.   Add up your projected expenses and deduct them from your projected rental income to see if renting will result in a profit or a loss.  If you project a loss, does your projected appreciation on the home while it’s rented compensate you for the time and money it will cost you? Do you have funds to cover a negative cash flow?  Your expenses may include your mortgage payment, property taxes, insurance, home owner’s association dues, maintenance and repairs, legal and accounting fees and property management fees.  A rule of thumb for maintenance and repairs is about 1 – 2% of the market value of your home, depending on the home’s condition.   You may need to spend money up front to attract good quality tenants.

When calculating your rental income, you need to decrease your projected rental income by about 8% to allow for vacancies.  In Colorado the average rental vacancy rate has been around 7-9 percent over the last five years, based on U.S. Census data.  When a renter moves or is evicted it can take several months to get a new renter in place.

If you rent you can take a tax deduction for depreciation against your rental income.  To calculate your annual depreciation, take the value of your home, on the date you begin renting, less the value of land and divide it by 27.5.  Unfortunately, this is just a temporary gift from the IRS.  When your home is sold you must recapture all of the depreciation at 25%.

Other potential drawbacks to renting your home include the possibility of major damage inflicted by a tenant, drawn out eviction processes, negligence or safety lawsuits and costly maintenance issues.

An additional consideration, if you have a capital gain on your home, is the loss of the capital gain exemption of $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for a couple if you haven’t lived in your home for 2 or the last 5 years.

Stock Can Be a Good Option in Retirement

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane M. Young

As we approach retirement, there is a common misconception that we need to abruptly transition our portfolios completely out of the stock market to be fully invested in fixed income investments.   One reason to avoid a sudden shift to fixed income is that retirement is fluid; it is not a permanent decision. Most people will and should gradually transition into retirement.  Traditional retirement is becoming less common because life expectancies are increasing and fewer people are receiving pensions. Most people will go in and out of retirement several times.  After many years we may leave a traditional career field for some well-deserved rest and relaxation.  However, after a few years of leisure we may miss the sense of purpose, accomplishment, and identity gained from working.  As a result, we may return to work in a new career field, do some consulting in an area where we had past experience or work part-time in a coffee shop.

Another problem with a drastic shift to fixed income is that we don’t need our entire retirement nest egg on the day we reach retirement.   The typical retirement age is around 65, based on current Social Security data, the average retiree will live for another twenty years. A small portion of our portfolio may be needed upon reaching retirement but a large percentage won’t be needed for many years.   It is important to keep long term money in a diversified portfolio, including stock mutual funds, to provide growth and inflation protection.   A reasonable rate of growth in our portfolio is usually needed to meet our goals. Inflation can take a huge bite out of the purchasing power of our portfolios over twenty years or more.   Historically, fixed income investments have just barely kept up with inflation while stock market investments have provided a nice hedge against inflation.

We need to think in terms of segregating our portfolios into imaginary buckets based on the timeframes in which money will be needed.  Money that is needed in the next few years should be safe and readily available.  Money that isn’t needed for many years can stay in a diversified portfolio based on personal risk tolerance.  Portfolios should be rebalanced on an annual basis to be sure there is easy access to money needed in the short term.

A final myth with regard to investing in retirement is that money needed to cover your retirement expenses must come from interest earning investments.  Sure, money needed in the short term needs to be kept in safe, fixed income investments to avoid selling stock when the market is down.  However, this doesn’t mean that we have to cover all of our retirement income needs with interest earning investments.  There may be several good reasons to cover retirement expenses by selling stock.   When the stock market is up it may be wise to harvest some gains or do some rebalancing.  At other times there may be tax benefits to selling stock.

 

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