Covering the High Cost of College Can Require Team Work, Diligence and Compromise

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

With soaring college expenses, few families can afford to cover the costs associated with putting their children through four years of college on top of daily living expenses and the need to save for retirement.   To avoid sacrificing your retirement savings and accruing large student loans, to finance your children’s college education, engage them in the process.  For most families, it is reasonable for the cost of college to be a shared responsibility between you and your children.

Start early by encouraging your children to get good grades, to participate in extracurricular activities, and to volunteer in the community.   While in high school, encourage your child to enroll in Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses that provide high school and college credit.  Your child could have several college courses completed before graduating from high school.  This could save you thousands of dollars. 

Explore all forms of financial aid even if you think you may not be eligible.  You may be surprised, especially if you have several children attending college at once.  Additionally, do your research and be open-minded with regard to the colleges you consider.  Some schools that seem too expensive may have excellent financial aid packages for your situation.

If you find yourself in the common place where you earn too much for financial aid, but not enough to pay the full ride of four year college education, research the availability of merit scholarships.   While your child is still in high school, thoroughly research the availability of scholarships.  Talk to the high school guidance counselor and check with community organizations.  Once in college your child should talk to the financial aid officer, department heads and professors for potential scholarship opportunities.  Also check on-line resources including CollegeBoard.com, CollegeNet.com, and Fastweb.com.  Every year many scholarships go unused because qualified candidates don’t apply.  

Your child can dramatically decrease the cost of tuition by attending a community college for the first two years and then transferring to a four year university.  Many universities have arrangements with local community colleges to transfer credits earned toward the first two years of a bachelor’s degree.    The cost of tuition at a community college is usually less than one half of that at a four year university. 

Another way to reap tremendous savings is for the student to live at home and attend a local school.  In 2014 the cost of tuition and fees at the University of Colorado is about $12,600 and the cost of room and board is about $13,000. 

If after exploring the options above, the cost of college is still beyond your reach; your student may need to work while attending college.  To help pay for tuition, your student may need to work 30 hours a week and take a lighter class load.  Graduating in five years may be better than incurring huge student loans.