Combine Your Financial Goal Setting with a Romantic Valentine’s Day Retreat

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Valentine’s Day is a time for showing love and appreciation for someone special in your life. It’s also a good time to work on your relationship and work on issues that cause conflict. One of the biggest sources of conflict and disagreement in relationships is money. Money itself isn’t the cause of our disagreements; we fight over our divergent goals and priorities for money. Many fights arise out of the lack of communication about our wishes, hopes and dreams. If you and your partner are constantly squabbling about money and how you spend your household income, I have a fun Valentine’s Day solution for you.

I suggest you take a romantic, strategic planning retreat. Block off a full weekend for you and your partner – no children allowed! Select a romantic Inn or Bed and Breakfast somewhere within a reasonable driving distance. The only requirement is a private area with a writing surface. Spend Friday night and all day Saturday discussing your values, sharing dreams, setting goals, creating a budget and making specific plans for the future. Reward yourself with a nice dinner and a romantic evening Saturday night, then play all day Sunday! Make this your Valentine’s Day gift to each other, this year, and every year.

10 Great Money Saving Ideas for the Holidays

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

1. Make a plan – who will receive a gift and how much do you plan to spend. Stick to your plan, keep track of your spending, and don’t spend on impulse.

2. Start early and give yourself plenty of time to select gifts and compare prices. We always over buy and spend too much when pressed for time.

3. Find creative ways to reduce the number of people for whom you plan to give gifts. Instead of buying gifts for friends make arrangements to make each other dinner or meet for an inexpensive happy hour. Remember that receiving a gift can be stressful and a nice a card or gesture may be more appropriate

4. Suggest that your family or group of friends draw names instead of buying gifts for everyone. It is difficult and expensive to buy gifts for a large number of people who already have everything.

5. Exchange white elephant gifts or favorite used books instead of expensive Christmas gifts. This is especially fun in conjunction with a Chinese gift exchange where everyone gets a chance to steal a gift from the other participants.

6. Gift a homemade present such as a homemade sauce, stew or soup, a painting, a knitted scarf, cookies, or a pie. You can capture a special moment by framing a photo or post card or you can create a calendar with some sentimental photographs.

7. If you have more time than money gift your services such as babysitting, home maintenance, faux painting, cooking a meal, house cleaning, shoveling snow, decorating advice, cooking lessons, a musical performance, or computer instruction.

8. Rather than providing all the food for your holiday party, ask your friends to bring a dish and a bottle of wine. Co-host a party with a few friends and share the cost. If you are planning a neighborhood party, consider a progressive party where each course is served at a different home.

9. Avoid purchasing expensive new holiday clothes. Make your existing wardrobe more festive through the use of inexpensive accessories and scarves. If you really need a new outfit check out your local consignment stores. Holiday and formal attire isn’t worn very often and is usually in good shape at consignment stores.

10. Lower the cost of Christmas cards and postage by using post cards, e-cards, e-mail or a simple phone call. It’s the thought that counts.

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