Watch Out for These Pitfalls with Social Security and IRA Rollovers

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Here are a couple issues on Social Security and IRA Rollovers that frequently catch people by surprise.

Think twice about taking your Social Security at 62 or before your regular retirement age, if you plan to work during this timeframe. In 2011, if you earn more than $14,160, Social Security will withhold $1 for every $2 earned above this amount. However, all is not lost, when you reach full retirement age Social Security will increase your benefits to make up for the benefits withheld. Once you reach your full retirement age there is no reduction in benefits for earning more than $14,160. However, the amount of tax you pay on your Social Security benefits will increase as your taxable income increases. This may be a good reason to wait until your full retirement age or until you stop working to begin taking Social Security.

If you are thinking about moving your IRA from one custodian to another I strongly encourage you to do this as a direct transfer and not as a rollover. We frequently use these terms synonymously but I assure you the IRS does not! A transfer is when you move your IRA directly from one IRA trustee/custodian to another – nothing is paid to you. A rollover is when a check is issued to you and you write a second check to the new IRA Trustee/Custodian. This must be done within 60 days or the transaction is treated as a taxable distribution. You can do as many transfers as you desire in a given year. However, you can only do one rollover per year, on a given IRA. This is a very stringent rule and there are very few exceptions even when the error is out of your control. Whenever possible be sure to use a direct transfer not a rollover to move your IRA Account.

“What is Modern Retirement and Will You be Ready?” Join us on September 7th for our next Pinnacle Fireside Chat.

Please mark your calendars for our next Pinnacle Financial “Fireside Chat”, to be held on Wednesday, September 7th from 7:30am – 9:00am.

Jane will discuss the characteristics of modern retirement and how to plan for it. She will explore different approaches to retirement and some of the factors to be considered. She will also explain the various plans available to help you save for retirement.

The Fireside Chat sessions are informational only (no sales!) and interactive — a great opportunity to learn new things and ask questions in a relaxed environment. These sessions are open to your family and friends, so please feel free to pass this email along to anyone that you think might be interested in attending.

Please call Judy (719-260-9800) if you would like to attend this session on September 7th, as space is limited.

We hope to see you on September 7th! Coffee and donuts will be served!

A Money Moment with Jane – A Few Financial Planning Suggestions for the Fall

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By Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

  • Required Minimum Distributions were not required for 2009.  However, if you are at least 70½ you will be required to take a distribution in 2010.

 

  • If you are planning to convert some of your regular IRA to a Roth IRA, do so in 2010 to spread the taxes over 2011 and 2112.

 

  • Have you maximized your Roth IRA and 401k contribution?  The 2010 contribution limit for the Roth is $5,000 plus a $1,000 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.  The 2010 contribution limit for 401k plans is $16,500 plus a $5,500 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.

 

  • This is a good time to do some tax planning to make sure your withholdings or estimates are adequate to cover the taxes you will owe in April. 

 

  • Do you have any underperforming stocks or mutual funds that should be sold to take advantage of a tax loss in 2010?

 

  • Now is the time to go through your home for items to be donated to charity.  These can provide a nice deduction on your 2010 tax return.

 

  • Start planning for Christmas now and save money by working to a plan. 

 

Your Money Bus is Coming to Colorado Springs

Your Money Bus is coming to Colorado Springs.

                               Get free professional advice, no strings attached

It’s never too late to secure your financial future.

Re: Free Non-profit Financial Education Event – Please share with friends, family and business associates.

All of us have family; friends and colleagues who are struggling to save money, eliminate debt and find jobs. Please share with them the opportunity to meet for a free one-on-one with local independent financial advisors when the national Your Money Bus Tour rolls into Colorado Springs on July 8th and 9th. Pinnacle Financial Concepts, Inc. is coordinating the Colorado Springs stop of this non-profit tour, visiting more that 25 cities. We will be volunteering at this event along with several other fee-only financial planning firms in town. The Your Money Bus Tour is sponsored by The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) Consumer Education Foundation, TD AMERITRADE, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine and FiLife.com.

The Your Money Bus Tour will stop in Colorado Springs at the Penrose Library (downtown) on July 8th from 12:00 – 7:00 and at UCCS, Lot 1 on July 9th from 12:00 – 5:00. At each stop, consumers can sit down with locally-based volunteer financial advisors to ask pressing financial questions. All Money Bus visitors will receive a free financial education kit, including a Kiplinger magazine and a budgetary workbook.

Forty percent of American families spend more than they earn and the average American with a credit file has more than $16,000 in debt, not including mortgages. We encourage people to stop byYour Money Bus to learn how to better save, eliminate debt and develop personal financial sustainability habits that will get them through and beyond these tough times.

The NAPFA Consumer Education Foundation is a 501c (3) organization committed to educating Americans on personal finance. Consumers need easy to understand information without any bias, sales, or conflicts of interest. All volunteer financial advisors are fee-only fiduciaries; nothing is being sold or promoted. This is strictly educational and free information for the public. The public is welcome to just stop by or make an appointment ahead of time.

For more information, visit www.YourMoneyBus.com and for up-to-date schedule information contact Krist Allnutt,krista.allnutt@perceptiononline.com.

Warmest Regards,

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Is Your Financial Advisor Really Working For You? NAPFA Press Release

 

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                Contact:  Benjamin Lewis

                                                                                                                                     Perception, Inc.

                                                                                                                                    (301) 963-7555

 

With a few basic questions, consumers can find out if

their best interests are being protected by their advisor.  

 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL (April 22, 2009) – As the events of the last several months have made clear, it’s never been more important for consumers to act in their own best interests when working with a financial advisor. Consumers must ask the right questions when selecting an advisor, AND they must keep asking questions on a regular basis.

 

The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) has been a vocal advocate for the consumer for more than 25 years and is currently working with other industry organizations, congressional leaders and regulators to encourage increased protection for consumers   However, even if new reforms are put in place, NAPFA encourages consumers to protect themselves by being proactive when establishing or engaging in an ongoing relationship with a financial advisor.

 

Regardless of which advisor is chosen, a consumer needs to ask the following questions:

 

  • Do you work with an independent custodian? Whether your advisor is managing your money or you are the person who signs off on each financial decision, your advisor should not be holding your money. Your money should be held by an independent custodian company. Make sure you know the name of the company; how to contact the company; and your account numbers.  Be sure to open and review your monthly statements and check on the accuracy of any trades and withdrawals in your accounts.

 

  • Will I be able to review all transactions that are made? When you receive your statements, be sure you carefully look at all transactions. Make sure you understand each purchase, sale, deposit and withdrawal and why it was made. If you have a question concerning a transaction, call your advisor immediately. If you aren’t satisfied with the answer you receive, call the custodian directly.

 

  • Will I be able to make checks payable to the custodian?  When making a deposit to your investment account, write the check to the custodian, not to your advisor.  Be careful of advisors who ask that checks to be made out to them.

 

  • Do you require a General Power of Attorney?  The General Power of Attorney document will allow your advisor to remove money from your accounts without your special consent.  Typically a Limited Power of Attorney, which allows the advisor to make trades on your behalf, is preferred.  You may want to discuss your personal situation with an attorney. 

 

  • Can I have copies of statements sent to a family member?  If you don’t understand your statements, tell your advisor to send copies to a family member or another professional who can help you.

 

  • Stay in contact with your advisor. Visit with your advisor at least annually, and stay in contact by e-mail or telephone. If your advisor is vague or evasive, ask for more information. Holding these regular meetings has the added benefit of making sure that you and your advisor are clear about your financial goals, risk tolerance, and investment strategy. In fact, poor communication between client and advisor is a more common source of dissatisfaction than any type of illegal activity.

 

“It is not good enough today to simply judge a financial advisor based on what you read on his or her website or in a brochure. You need to speak with them,” said Diahann W. Lassus, CFP®, CPA/PFS, national chair of NAPFA.  “Advisors who are going to act in your best interests will be forthright and honest about how they operate and will truly act in a fiduciary capacity at all times.”

 

Consumers who are still unsure after talking with an advisor should review the advisor’s Form ADV, which is always available upon request. Additional information about a firm may be found on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Central Registration Depository website at http://www.sec.gov/answers/crd.htm. 

 

To obtain a longer list of questions to ask an advisor, use the Financial Advisor Diagnostic, developed by NAPFA. The Diagnostic is available for free at http://www.napfa.org/tips_tools/index.asp.

 

“Consumers who take the time to ask the right questions and do the necessary research will ultimately become smarter consumers of financial services,” said Ms. Lassus.

 

If you are interested in discussing consumer protection, please contact Benjamin Lewis at (301) 963-7555 or Benjamin.lewis@perceptiononline.com.

 

 

About NAPFA

 

Since 1983, The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) has provided Fee-Only financial planners across the country with some of the strictest guidelines possible for professional competency, comprehensive financial planning, and Fee-Only compensation.  With more than 2,200 members across the country, NAPFA has become the leading professional association in the United States dedicated to the advancement of Fee-Only financial planning.

 

For more information on NAPFA, please visit www.napfa.org.

Ten Things You Can Do Now To Save Taxes in 2009

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Whew!! The 2008 tax season is finally over and we can relax. Well not exactly; this is a great time to prepare for 2009 taxes. A little effort now can help you save in 2009 and will make the process a whole lot smoother. Below are some ideas to help save taxes in 2009.

1. Create a folder for your 2009 tax documents and receipts. Create a file right now, and keep it somewhere convenient, to keep track of all those expenses and donations as they occur.

2. Start going through your old clothes and junk in the garage and donate it to a charity of your choice, if you itemize this can provide a sizable deduction. Remember, keep a log of everything you donate and get a receipt!

3. If you anticipate a substantial change in your 2009 income or if you owed a lot in 2008, now is the time to adjust your withholdings or your estimated payments. There is nothing worse than owing an unexpected $5000 at the end of the year.

4. Maximize your contribution to tax deferred retirement plans. Limits on the 401k, Simple and SEP have all increased this year. If you turned 50 this year you can now make catch-up contributions to your retirement plans including your IRA (assuming you are otherwise qualified).

5. Do you anticipate a decrease in income this year? You may be eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA or for a conversion from a Roth IRA to a traditional IRA. The recent drop in the stock market has made conversion to a Roth IRA very appealing. You can pay income taxes on your account now, while the balance is low. Then during retirement, when the market has recovered, you can take tax free withdrawals. In 2009 your AGI must be less than $100,000 to be eligible for a conversion.

6. Will you be paying college expenses sometime soon? If you live in Colorado you can invest the money you will be spending on college expenses in a 529 plan and deduct the contribution from your state income tax. If you have a couple kids in college this can be significant. Don’t worry; you can invest the money in something very safe within the 529 if you are worried about market volatility.

7. If you are a first time homeowner you may be eligible for a 10% credit up to $8000 if you buy a home by December 1, 2009. This is really more like an interest free loan because it must be paid back over 15 years. Additionally, it is subject to income limits. The credit begins to phase-out for joint filers with modified adjusted gross income of $150,000 or more.

8. Are you thinking about buying a new car? You may be able to deduct the sales and local tax if you buy the car this year. This is subject to an income phase out if your adjusted gross income exceeds $125,000. I know they take all the good stuff away from middle class wage earners.

9. If you own a business or work as a consultant, be sure to keep accurate and complete records. Don’t forget to track your mileage, the current deduction for business mileage is $.55 per mile. This is frequently overlooked or understated due to poor record keeping. Additionally, if you work in your home and have a dedicated work area you may want to claim a home office deduction.

10. Take advantage of the drop in the stock market to do some tax harvesting. Tax harvesting is taking advantage of a market decline to sell some of the dogs in your investment portfolio while taking a capital loss or reduced capital gain. Prior to the market drop, the sale of a particular security may have been prohibitive due to capital gains. Now you can take advantage of the drop in the market to clean up your portfolio or do some re-balancing of your asset allocation.

Finding Peace of Mind in Turbulent Times

 Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

                                         

1. Don’t lose sight of your investment timeframe.  You’ve heard it time and time again but stock is a long term investment.  So, don’t let the current drop in the stock market cause you to make drastic changes to money you won’t need for 10, 15 or 20 years.   If you don’t need your money for 5 to 10 years stop worrying about it, the market will recover.   If you are in or approaching retirement, you should have put aside the money you will need in the short term.   Use this for your immediate needs.   Down the road in 5 or 10 years when you need to tap into your stock mutual funds they should be back to reasonable levels.   Don’t lose sleep about the level of your investments 10 years from now.

 

2. Every financial crisis feels like the end of the world while we are in it.  If you were to look at the headlines during any one of the past financial downturns you couldn’t differentiate them from today.   Every time we go through a financial crisis whether it’s the savings and loan crisis in the 80’s or the dot.com crisis the message is the same.  This time it’s different, things will never be the same, the sky is falling and so forth.   Everything isn’t rosy, but we will recover from this.  We need to avoid making decisions based on emotion and fear.  The media is in the business to sell papers or increase viewers.  They are going to sensationalize our economic situation.  Good news does not provide high ratings.    Take a deep breath, hug your kids, walk your dog, live your life and stay the course with your portfolio – this too shall pass.

 

3. Don’t pass up a once in a lifetime opportunity to invest in stock at exceptionally low values.  Sure it has been exceptionally painful to watch the stock portion of our portfolios drop by 40% but what a great opportunity we have.   If you have a long time horizon now is a great time to invest in the stock market.  I encourage you to invest a set amount of money into a diversified set of stock mutual funds every month (dollar cost averaging).   Investing in your company 401k or a Roth IRA is a great way to make systematic investments.   Now is the time to invest, not to sit on the sidelines.  It is always darkest before the dawn.  Remember, the stock market is counterintuitive – you feel like selling when you should be buying and you feel like buying when you should be selling.  Therefore, right now we should be buying!!!   When you feel it is safe to buy again it will be too late.

 

4.  Choose your battles and focus on what you can control.  You can’t control the fluctuations in the stock market or where the market is headed.  However, you can better prepare yourself for a weak economy.  Maybe now is the time to cut your personal spending and build up your emergency fund.  Evaluate how to reduce your expenses and pay off debt. Make sure your skills are current and relevant.  Build and strengthen your network now before you really need it.  If you are approaching retirement, and the market has set you back, evaluate alternatives and contingency plans.   Take advantage of opportunities available to you – buy stock mutual funds at low values,  re-finance your home at a low interest rate, convert your traditional IRA to a Roth and sell those especially weak stocks to harvest tax losses.