10 Tips for Financial Success

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Jane M. Young CFP, EA

1. Set Goals –
Review your personal values, develop a personal strategic plan, establish specific goals for the next three years and identify action steps for the coming year.

2. Understand Your Current Situation –
Review your actual expenses over the last year and develop a budget or a cash flow plan for the next 12 months. Compare your expenses and your income to better understand your cash flow situation. Are you’re spending habits aligned with your goals? Can or should you be saving more?

3. Have sufficient Liquidity –
Maintain an emergency fund equal to at least four months of expenses in a fully liquid account. Additionally, I recommend having a secondary emergency fund equal to another three months of expenses in semi-liquid investments. Increase your liquidity if you have above average volatility in your life due to job instability, rental properties or other risk factors.

4. Always save at least 10% of your income –
Regardless of whether you are saving to fund your emergency fund or retirement you should always pay yourself first by saving at least 10% of your income. Most of us need to be saving closer to 15% to meet our retirement needs.

5. Pay-off Credit Cards and Consumer Debt –
Learn the difference between bad debt (credit cards) and good debt (fixed-rate home mortgage). Avoid the bad debt and take advantage of the leveraging power of good debt.

6. Take Advantage of the Leveraging Power of Owning Your Home –
Once you have established an emergency fund and have paid off your bad debt start saving for a down payment to purchase your own home.

7. Fully Fund Your Retirement Accounts be a tax smart investor –
Participate in tax advantaged retirement programs for which you qualify. Maximize your Roth IRA and 401k contribution take full advantage of any company match on your 401k. If you are self-employed consider a SEP or Simple plan. Always select investment vehicles that provide the most beneficial tax solution while meeting your investment objectives.

8. Be an Investor, Not a Trader. Don’t time the market and don’t let emotions drive your investment decisions –
Investing in the stock market is a long term endeavor, forecasting the short-term movement of the stock market is fruitless. Avoid emotional reactions to headlines and short-term events. Don’t overreact to sensationalistic journalists or chase the latest investment trends. You can establish a defensive position by maintaining a well diversified portfolio custom tailored to your unique situation. Slow and steady wins the race!
“Far more money has been lost by investors in preparing for corrections, or anticipating corrections, than has been lost in the corrections themselves.”  -Peter Lynch, author and former mutual fund manager with Fidelity Investments

9. Don’t Invest in anything you don’t understand and be aware of high fees and penalties –
If it sounds too good to be true and you just can’t get your head around it, don’t invest in it! If you want to invest in complicated products, read the fine print. Be aware of commissions, fees and surrender charges. Be especially wary of products with a contingent deferred sales charge. There is no free lunch, if you are being promised above market returns there is probably a catch. Keep in mind that contracts are written to protect the insurance or investment company not the investor.

10. Diversify, Diversify, Diversify – rebalance annually –
It is impossible to predict fluctuations in the market or to select the next great stock. However, you can hedge your bets by maintaining a well diversified portfolio. Establish an asset allocation that is aligned with your goals, investment timeframe and risk tolerance. You should have a good mix of fixed income and equity based investments. Your equity investments should be spread over a wide variety of large, small, domestic and international companies and industries. Re-balance your portfolio on an annual basis to stay diversified and weed out any underperforming investments.

Year End Financial Planning Tips

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Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

Roth Conversion –
The income limitations on converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA have been eliminated and taxes due on a Roth conversion, processed in 2010, can be paid in 2011 and 2012.

Required Minimum Distribution –
A required minimum distribution on your IRA and 401k/403b is required every year once you attain 70 ½.

Maximize your retirement contributions –
Be sure to maximize your retirement plan contributions for 2010. Below are the maximum contributions for your 401k and IRA contributions for 2010. You have until April 15th to contribute to your IRA.

401k – $16,500 plus a $5,500 catch-up provision if you are over 50
IRA – $5,000 plus a $1,000 catch-up provision if you are over 50 (income limits apply)
Simple – $11,500 plus a $2,500 catch-up provision if you are over 50

Adjust retirement contributions for 2011 –
There is no change to 401k and IRA contribution limits between 2010 and 2011. However, if you have turned 50 you can make a catch-up contribution. A change in your income may also impact your ability to contribute to an IRA.

Harvest Tax Losses –
If you have been thinking about selling some poor performing stocks or mutual funds, do so before the end of the year to take advantage of tax losses in 2010. However, if capital gains rates increase in 2011 it may be more advantageous to offset gains in 2011.

Charity Contributions –
Go through your closets and garage before the end of the year and donate any unwanted items to get a nice deduction on your tax return. When you drop off your items be sure to get a receipt. When making a charitable contribution, consider donating appreciated stock rather than cash.

Take advantage of the annual gift allowance –
In 2010 you can gift up to $13,000 per person without paying gift tax or impacting your estate tax exemption.

Make 529 Contributions –
Contributions made to the Colorado 529 plan are deductible on your state tax return. Money can be contributed into the Colorado 529 plan for tuition that is payable in 2011.

Review your expenses and draft a new budget –
Everyone should review their expenses and revise their budget at least once a year. December is a good time of year to review historical spending habits and make adjustments to your budget for the coming year. It is difficult to establish saving goals without a good understanding of what is available after your non-discretionary expenses.

Set financial goals for 2011 –
I recommend setting new personal and financial goals at the beginning of every year. Think of it as personal strategic planning. Set some long term goals for 3-5 years then identify some action plans for the next twelve months.

Adjust tax withholdings for 2011 –
Adjust your tax withholdings or estimated taxes for anticipated changes in income and deductions in 2011.

Organize 2010 tax documents –
Year end is a good time to create a folder for all of the 2010 tax documents you will be receiving and to start organizing your expenses and receipts. You will have everything thing in one place when it comes time to complete your tax return.

Make adjustments for changes in family circumstances – birth, death, marriage, dependents, and retirement –
Major changes in your life circumstances may result in numerous changes in your financial situation. For example a birth, marriage, or death will probably necessitate a change in your will and beneficiary designations. It also may impact your income tax withholdings. The birth of a child may result in significant tax benefits. With the birth of a child you also may want to consider starting a college fund and a change in life or disability insurance.

Spend FSA accounts –
With many companies, flexible savings accounts cannot be carried over into the next year so be sure to spend the money in your FSA account this year, before you lose it.

Consider the impact of possible changes in the tax law –
If the Bush tax cuts are not extended, there is a possibility that the capital gains rate will increase from 15% to 20%, that tax rates will increase, and that some tax deductions will disappear. These possibilities need to be considered in making your year end financial decisions.

A Money Moment with Jane – A Few Financial Planning Suggestions for the Fall

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By Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

 

  • Required Minimum Distributions were not required for 2009.  However, if you are at least 70½ you will be required to take a distribution in 2010.

 

  • If you are planning to convert some of your regular IRA to a Roth IRA, do so in 2010 to spread the taxes over 2011 and 2112.

 

  • Have you maximized your Roth IRA and 401k contribution?  The 2010 contribution limit for the Roth is $5,000 plus a $1,000 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.  The 2010 contribution limit for 401k plans is $16,500 plus a $5,500 catch-up provision if you are 50 or older.

 

  • This is a good time to do some tax planning to make sure your withholdings or estimates are adequate to cover the taxes you will owe in April. 

 

  • Do you have any underperforming stocks or mutual funds that should be sold to take advantage of a tax loss in 2010?

 

  • Now is the time to go through your home for items to be donated to charity.  These can provide a nice deduction on your 2010 tax return.

 

  • Start planning for Christmas now and save money by working to a plan. 

 

Your Money Bus is Coming to Colorado Springs

Your Money Bus is coming to Colorado Springs.

                               Get free professional advice, no strings attached

It’s never too late to secure your financial future.

Re: Free Non-profit Financial Education Event – Please share with friends, family and business associates.

All of us have family; friends and colleagues who are struggling to save money, eliminate debt and find jobs. Please share with them the opportunity to meet for a free one-on-one with local independent financial advisors when the national Your Money Bus Tour rolls into Colorado Springs on July 8th and 9th. Pinnacle Financial Concepts, Inc. is coordinating the Colorado Springs stop of this non-profit tour, visiting more that 25 cities. We will be volunteering at this event along with several other fee-only financial planning firms in town. The Your Money Bus Tour is sponsored by The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) Consumer Education Foundation, TD AMERITRADE, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine and FiLife.com.

The Your Money Bus Tour will stop in Colorado Springs at the Penrose Library (downtown) on July 8th from 12:00 – 7:00 and at UCCS, Lot 1 on July 9th from 12:00 – 5:00. At each stop, consumers can sit down with locally-based volunteer financial advisors to ask pressing financial questions. All Money Bus visitors will receive a free financial education kit, including a Kiplinger magazine and a budgetary workbook.

Forty percent of American families spend more than they earn and the average American with a credit file has more than $16,000 in debt, not including mortgages. We encourage people to stop byYour Money Bus to learn how to better save, eliminate debt and develop personal financial sustainability habits that will get them through and beyond these tough times.

The NAPFA Consumer Education Foundation is a 501c (3) organization committed to educating Americans on personal finance. Consumers need easy to understand information without any bias, sales, or conflicts of interest. All volunteer financial advisors are fee-only fiduciaries; nothing is being sold or promoted. This is strictly educational and free information for the public. The public is welcome to just stop by or make an appointment ahead of time.

For more information, visit www.YourMoneyBus.com and for up-to-date schedule information contact Krist Allnutt,krista.allnutt@perceptiononline.com.

Warmest Regards,

Jane M. Young, CFP, EA

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