There is More to Retirement Than the Money

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Are you concerned that you don’t have the financial means to fully retire anytime soon? That may not be such a bad thing. There is much more to retirement than reaching some magic number where you will be able to cover your living expenses. Your personal identity may be closely aligned with your career. Personal identity plays a huge role in your self-esteem and happiness. Your sense of accomplishment and purpose can also be tied to your work. The structure, responsibility and expectations from your job give you a sense of purpose and help you feel appreciated. Retirement may have a dramatic impact on your personal identity and sense of relevance. Make a plan to transition into your retirement adventure with a new sense of direction and purpose.
Many of your relationships are connected to your career. Relationships with colleagues, clients, co-workers and suppliers account for a lot of your social interactions. These are people with whom you have a common understanding and intertwined social connections. Think about the impact retirement may have on these connections. How will you replace this sense of community and nurture these relationships after retirement?
Another consideration in retirement is keeping your mind stimulated. At work our minds are fully engaged as we juggle several different tasks at once. This may be exhausting, but it keeps our minds stimulated and energized. A study conducted by the Rand Center for the Study of Aging and the University of Michigan found that early retirement can have a significant negative impact on the cognitive ability of people in their early 60’s. The study concluded that people need to stay active to preserve their memories and reasoning abilities. As you transition into retirement, be sure stay mentally active and engaged.
You may be looking forward to retirement in anticipation of doing all the fun things you currently have no time for. Retirees frequently enter retirement with tremendous enthusiasm and fill their first few years with exciting trips and activities. However, after a while you tire of these activities, the activities lack the substance to make you feel truly fulfilled. You start missing the sense of affirmation, self- identity and purpose you found in your job. You have time to engage in fun activities every day, but it’s just not enough, you aren’t fully satisfied.
It doesn’t have to be this way. Before you jump into retirement, give some serious thought about what you will do in retirement. How will you stay socially and emotionally engaged in a way that is truly meaningful and rewarding? Engage in activities that will feed your self-esteem. Consider a new, part-time career, set some fitness goals, engage in volunteer activities, or take up a meaningful hobby. Decide how you will develop new social networks. Once you are retired, what will you say and how will you feel when someone asks – What do you do?

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