Managing a Sudden Windfall

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

If you are fortunate enough to receive a significant windfall give yourself some time before making any major decisions.   A sudden influx of cash from an inheritance, winning the lottery, life insurance or the sale of a business can cause a major disruption in your life.    Over 50% of all windfalls are lost in a short period of time.  NBC news reported that more than 70% of all lottery winners exhausted their fortunes within 3 years.   You need some time to emotionally adjust to your situation and to create a plan.

You may experience a variety of new emotions and it’s important to avoid making decisions for the wrong reasons.  Some common emotions include guilt, loss of identity, isolation, anxiety, unworthiness, fear, intimidation and a lack of confidence.  It’s crucial to recognize and deal with these emotions before making big spending decisions that may hamper your long term financial security.  You also may feel pressure from friends and family.  Stand your ground and take the time needed to develop a well thought out plan.

You also want to carefully select a team of trusted advisors to help manage your windfall.  Most people will need a Certified Financial Planner, a Certified Public Accountant and an Estate Planning Attorney.  It’s essential to develop a financial plan, fully understand the tax implications of your windfall and put a new estate plan in place.

Initially your financial plan should include establishing an emergency fund equal to about one year of expenses, paying off your high interest debt, and making sure your new found wealth is adequately protected.  A significant windfall will probably necessitate the purchase of more liability insurance.  Additionally, you should address any health concerns that you or your immediate family may have been neglecting.  Also consider reducing your overhead by purchasing a home or paying off your mortgage.  This is also a good time to take care of any maintenance and repairs that you have been putting off.

Once your immediate concerns are addressed, think about the future.  If you were unable to cover your living expenses prior to the windfall, make a plan to cover your monthly cash flow needs.  Next develop a retirement plan to make sure your expenses in retirement are covered.  Consider saving for your children’s college and setting aside money for major necessary expenditures such as vehicles and appliances.   If you are in an unrewarding career, consider going back to school to transition into something more fulfilling.

Once you have addressed all of your current and future financial needs feel free to spend on some discretionary items.  You may want to help a friend or family member who is in need, make a charitable contribution, start a business, or plan some vacations.   At this point you can spend some money on having fun.  Unfortunately too many people start with fun and quickly spend through their entire fortune.

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