Most Effective Investment Approach Combination of Male and Female Traits

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Numerous studies have found that men and women generally approach investing differently.  Generalizations can be dangerous but there is ample evidence to indicate there are some common gender traits that may hinder our investment performance.  An increased awareness of our potential strengths and weaknesses may help us to adjust our behavior for a better outcome.

Studies have found that men are more confident than women when it comes to investing.  According to Meir Statman, professor of finance with Santa Clara University, “Women tend to be less overconfident than men.  In the stock market, where so much is random, trying to do better than average is more likely to get you results that are below average.  This really is where all the confidence is going to hurt you”.  On the positive side confidence can prompt you to make a decision and take action, but overconfidence can result in taking too much risk and investing in things you don’t know enough about.  A lack of confidence can result in taking too little risk and a reluctance to take action.

In another study conducted by Brad M. Barber, professor at UC Davis and Terrance Odean, professor at UC Berkeley, researchers found that overconfidence leads men to trade excessively.  As a result their returns suffer more than women’s.  But women and men sell securities indiscriminately;    women just do it less often, so their performance doesn’t suffer as much.

According to the 2010 study by the Boston Consulting Group, women have a tendency to focus more on long term goals.  Their investment strategy and risk tolerance revolves around long term goals and financial security.  Men have more of a business orientation and tend to be more focused on efficient transactions and short term performance.  Men are likely to be more competitive and thrill seeking in nature which can lead to a focus on short term returns.  Women’s longer time horizon may help them to prepare for retirement but if they are overly concerned with security they may not take enough risk to earn the investment returns needed to meet retirement needs.

Additionally, the Blackrock Investor Pulse Survey of 4,000 Americans found that 48% of women describe themselves as knowledgeable about saving and investing vs. 57% of men.  Women generally felt less confident making investment decisions and investing in the stock market.  Typically women were likely to do more research, take more time to make investment decisions, use more self-control and stay the course.

Studies have also indicated women enjoy learning about investments in a group setting and men are more likely to be independent learners.  Women are also more receptive to financial research and advice.

The best approach to successful investing is a blend of habits commonly practiced by both men and women.  Identify your personal biases and tendencies and make adjustments to achieve optimal investment results.

Volatile Market Good Time for Retirement Savings

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

This is a great time to maximize your retirement contributions.  Not only will you save money on taxes but you can buy stock mutual funds on sale.  The one year return on the S&P 500 is down about 8% and market volatility is likely to continue throughout the year.

Dollar cost averaging is a great way to invest during a volatile market and it is well suited for contributing to your retirement plans.  With dollar cost averaging you invest a set amount every month or quarter up to your annual contribution limit.  When the stock market is low you buy more shares and when the market is high you buy fewer shares.  You can take advantage of dips in the market and avoid buying too much at, inopportune times when the market is high.

Ideally, the goal is to maximize contributions to your tax advantaged retirement plans however, this isn’t always possible.  Prioritize by contributing to your employer’s 401k plan up to the match, if your employer matches your contributions.   Your next priority is usually to maximize contributions to your Roth and then resume contributions to your 401k, 403b, 457 or self-employment plan.   Contributions to traditional employer plans are made with before tax dollars and taxable at regular income tax rates when withdrawn.  Roth contributions are made with after tax dollars and are tax free when withdrawn in retirement.   Some employers have begun to offer a Roth option with their 401k or 403b plans.

For 2015 and 2016 the maximum you can contribute to an IRA is $5,500 plus a catch-up provision of $1,000, if you were 50 or older by the last day of the year.  You have until the due date of your return, not including extensions, to make a contribution – which is April 18 for 2015. There are income limits on who can contribute to a Roth IRA.  In 2015, eligibility to contribute to a Roth IRA phases out at a Modified Adjusted Income (MAGI) of $116,000 to $131,000 for single filers and $183,000 to $193,000 for joint filers.  In 2016 the phase out is $117,000 to $132,000 for single filers and $184,000 to $194,000 for joint filers.

Your 401k contribution limits for both 2015 and 2016 are $18,000 plus a catch-up provision of $6,000, if you were 50 or over by the end of the year.  If you are employed by a non-profit organization, contact your benefits office for contribution limits on your plan.

If you are self-employed maximize your Simple (Savings Investment Match Plan for Employees) or SEP (Simplified Employee Pension Plan) and if you don’t already have a plan consider starting one to help defer taxes until retirement.

Regardless of your situation take advantage of retirement plans to defer or reduce income taxes on your retirement savings.  Current market volatility may provide some good opportunities to help boost your retirement nest egg.

Avoid These Common Retirement Mistakes

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

When it comes to retirement there are many preconceived notions and myths on how you should handle your finances.  Avoid falling into the trap of what retirees are “supposed to do”.  Instead, logically evaluate your situation and make decisions accordingly.   Below are some common financial mistakes to avoid with regard to your retirement.

  • Don’t underestimate your life expectancy and how many years you will spend in retirement. It is reasonable to spend 20 to 30 years in retirement.  Most retiree’s should plan to cover expenses well into their 90’s.
  • Avoid overestimating your ability and opportunity to work during retirement. Be cautious about including too much income for work during retirement in your cash flow projections.  You may lose your job or have trouble finding a good paying position.  Additionally, your ability and desire to work during retirement may be hindered by health issues or the need to care for a spouse.
  • Many retirees invest too conservatively and fail to consider the impact of inflation on their nest egg. Maintain a diversified portfolio that supports the time frame in which you will need money.  Money needed in the short term should be in safer, fixed income investments.  Alternatively, long term money can be invested in stock mutual funds where you have a better chance to earning returns that will outpace inflation.
  • Resist the temptation to take Social Security early. Most people should wait and take Social Security at their full retirement age or later, full retirement is between 66 and 67 for most individuals.  Taking Social Security early results in a reduced benefit. If you can delay taking Social Security you can earn a higher benefit that increases 8% per year up to age 70.  This can provide nice longevity insurance if you live beyond the normal life expectancy.  You also want to avoid taking Social Security early if you are still working.  In 2016 you will lose $1 for every $2 earned over $15,720, prior to reaching your full Social Security retirement age.
  • Avoid spending too much on your adult children. The desire to help your children is natural but many retirees need this money to cover their own expenses.   You may be on a fixed income and no longer able to earn a living, your children should have the ability to continue working for many years.

One of the biggest retirement mistakes is the failure to do any retirement planning.  Crunch some numbers to determine how much you need to put away, when you can retire, and what kind of budget you will need to follow.  Without proper planning many retirees pull too much from their investments early on leaving them strapped later in life.  It’s advisable to have your own customized retirement plan done to determine how much you can annually pull from your investments.  As a general rule, annual distributions should not exceed 3-4% of your retirement portfolio.

Grandparents Should Consider Financial Aid When Contributing to 529 Plans

Jane Young, CFP, EA

Jane Young, CFP, EA

With the high cost of college many grandparents want to help their grandchildren with college.   One of the best ways to accomplish this can be through the use of 529 plans.

A 529 plan allows you to invest money for college with tax free earnings and tax free withdrawals, as long as the money is used for qualified higher education expenses.  Your grandchildren can use this money at any eligible post-secondary institution.  In Colorado your 529 contribution is deductible on your state income taxes.  Additionally, the owner of a 529 plan can change the beneficiary of a 529 plan as the needs of grandchildren change.

There are special gift tax benefits when contributing to a 529 plan.  The current annual gift tax exclusion is $14,000.  This means that both grandparents can gift up to $14,000 to each grandchild.  Additionally, with 529s you can make a one-time contribution of up to $70,000, if you treat the contribution as if it were made over 5 years.

Unfortunately, if your grandchildren are eligible for need based financial aid, utilizing a 529 plan for your grandchildren’s college expenses can hurt their chances of getting financial aid.  The amount invested in the 529 is not reported on the FAFSA (Free Application for Student Aid) but payments made to cover college expenses are included in the student’s income.  This income will reduce the student’s financial aid by 50% of the amount of the payment.

To avoid this problem you can transfer ownership of the 529 to the parent’s name before the student applies for financial aid.  For financial aid purposes a parental 529 is considered an asset and only 5.64% of the value is considered when calculating needs based aid.  About a dozen states do not allow transfer of ownership on 529 plans – ownership transfers are allowed in Colorado.

Alternatively, you could initially contribute to a parental 529 plan but you would lose the state income tax deduction and you lose control of the account.  The owner of the 529 account can change beneficiary designations and can spend money from the account, subject to a 10% penalty if not used for qualified college expenses.  Loss of control could be a concern in the case of divorce or blended families.

Another way to avoid an adverse impact to financial aid is to delay use of the grandparent’s 529 until January 1st of the student’s junior year in college.  Contributions after this day will have no impact on the student’s eligibility for financial aid.  You won’t have to report the 529 as an asset on FAFSA and the contributions from the account are not reported as student income.   This is a viable option if the student has other resources to pay for college up to this point and they still have enough college expenses to use all of the funds in the 529 account.

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